“Play-dohing” with Fractions

Before I talk about what we did with fractions yesterday, three things are on my mind:

Nothings better!

Nothings better!

1. Is there really anything better than a new box of crayons? The smell, the colors, the perfectly pointy ends- it all makes me very happy!  (Can you tell I’m a primary teacher? 😉 )

Big and Little

Big and Little

2. I haven’t been talking much about my pre-k and Kindergarten class! This little bunch of friends is so much fun and keep me on my toes! For someone who teaches first grade during the year, it is a big adjustment teaching pre-k, but I’m finding it a great, fun challenge! So far we’ve covered colors, shapes, and began sorting things based on those attributes. We also took time to sort by size: big or little. Here is a wall in our room with their end products- the kids had to split their paper in half and on one side draw little things, and on the other draw big things. Their pictures are very cute and most students did a fantastic job! (The best part was one small friend who said, “Ms. Tasch, look at my tornado picture! Whoooosh!” I smiled and said, “That’s wonderful, but where are your big and little pictures?” He looked slightly confused, pointed to his picture again, and simply said, “But…… whooooooosh!” 🙂

Yum

Yum

3. The other night, I had a taste for veggie pizza. We had all the ingredients at home, but no ranch seasoning! I didn’t want to run to the store to buy a pack- and those things are kind of expensive for such a small item!- so I went on Pinterest (always) and found a way to make it at home. Using seasoning we already had, I whipped up a batch and added it to the cream cheese. I tasted it…. and was shocked how good it was! Just like the package from the store- but no money spent! This is the recipe I used!

 

OK, with that off my mind I’m ready to focus on yesterday’s math lesson- fraction review! Since we’ve been focusing on halves and fourths, we used what we knew about those concepts and applied it to different fractions. We knew that the bottom number of the fraction told us how many pieces it was split into. So, I used our Sand Art app and drew some shapes for the students to see. Volunteers came up and split the shape into a fraction I called out.

Making fractions!

Making fractions!

Since they know the bottom number tells how many pieces, they can apply that to making fractions they’ve never made before. 1/8 must have 8 pieces, 1/10 must have 10, and so on.

The kids really love this app because they think it’s very cool they are using their finger to draw. It’s a very simple, but effective way to practice EQUAL PARTS and different fractions.

Splitting shapes into fractions

Splitting shapes into fractions

(P.S. Even though it isn’t pictured in this one, we did practice splitting a triangle into thirds. The triangle always seems to be the shape kids struggle with- they want to cut it horizontally and vertically, but that doesn’t produce equal pieces. Remind them whenever they are splitting shapes, all pieces need to be the same!)

After some technology practice, we moved on to practice with play-doh! We went over play-doh rules- including no play-doh in our hair, in our mouths, or on our clothes- because someone always does one of these things even though no one would ever do any of those things 😉 and were ready to begin! The kids cracked open their jars and were ready!

I called out a shape for them to make. The students were extremely creative on making their shapes look perfect. Some used a Popsicle stick (which they had all been given with the play-doh) to cut out the shape, some formed with their hands, others used the lid to help them. Then, I’d call out the fraction to split the shape into. They used their stick to split the shape into equal pieces!

Splitting the shape

Splitting the shape

You can see the shape (square) and the fractions (fourths).

 

Fourths

Fourths

Play-doh fractions!

Play-doh fractions!

 

Having fun while making fractions!

Having fun while making fractions!

We kept going, making different shapes and cutting them into different fraction pieces.

 

Shapes

Shapes

Fourths

Fourths

I love teaching fractions like this because the kids are applying their knowledge! It’s also a quick assessment for me- do they understand shapes? Do they understand equal pieces? Do they understand different fractions?

Having a blast!

Having a blast!

I picked up Popsicle sticks from the dollar store and they worked great to help the students cut the shapes into pieces. They also doubled as “shape shapers” (totally a word) by helping the kids make the play-doh into different shapes.

A square in fourths!

A square in fourths!

Play-doh is also a great medium to practice with because mistakes can be easily fixed! When we practiced splitting a triangle in thirds, a few kids made some mistakes. But, it’s so easy to simply flip the shape over, push the play-doh back together, and try again! (Perseverance is a theme is this classroom- we never give up!)

This is what my first and second graders did to practice fractions. My next post will be about my older students making “fraction self-portraits”- a.k.a. the cutest (and most educational) fraction project you’ll ever see!

Have a fantastic weekend! 🙂

Fraction Sorting and Matching

This week has been all about FRACTIONS! On Monday we took a pre-assessment so I could see where the kids readiness levels were at; the results- most students could split shapes in half, some could split them in fourths, and some could split shapes into other fractions as well. What I noticed most students needed additional help on was splitting shapes into EQUAL fractions! Meaning, splitting the shapes into pieces that were the same size and the same shape. For example, you can’t split a heart in half horizontally because the top piece doesn’t match the bottom piece.

So, we set out this week to review fractions, review what the numbers meant in a written fraction, and to practice equal pieces.

On Monday we began by simply splitting shapes in half. Most kids love pretending the shape is something else (like a pizza or a cookie) and splitting it in half with a friend. There’s a great app- Sand Art, Story time with Nina- that is basically a drawing pad. It looks like you’re drawing on sand and the kids loved using it to make shapes and split the shapes in half.

After that, all the students got into small groups. I gave each group picture cards- which can be downloaded for FREE HERE On each card was a different shape. All the shapes were split in half, but only SOME of the shapes were split into equal halves. Their first job was to sort the pictures into two groups: equal fraction pieces and unequal fraction pieces.

Sorting

Sorting

The students worked together to figure out what pile to put the card into.

 

Sorting into piles

Sorting into piles

It was also great to see their teamwork in action. Some groups split the pictures equally and each sorted them on their own. Some groups preferred to have one person hold up a card and all decide where it should go together.

 

Sorting equal and unequal pieces

Sorting equal and unequal pieces

After the sort, students from each group held up one card and explained what pile it should be in and WHY! (It’s not just important that it is in the correct pile, but equally important that they are able to tell you why) All the students were able to look at the pictures and tell why or why not it was split into equal pieces. This activity was a great way for them to practice reasoning skills and explain their own thinking.

After the sort, we used the same cards to play another game- matching! Each shape had a matching pair, which some of the students noticed during the sorting game. For the next part, we flipped all of the cards over. (Teacher tip: I had glued all the cards onto pieces of construction paper so that when we played this matching game, they wouldn’t be able to see through the paper and see the shape. But as an added bonus, this made it VERY easy to keep track of what pieces went with what game. I used a different color paper for each set, so we didn’t have any missing or extra pieces! I love when that happens! 🙂 )

Matching

Matching

The kids were instantly excited! They went back to their groups, flipped over their piles, and got to work playing the matching game- trying to find the two shapes that were the same.

 

Do they match?

Do they match?

Finding a pair!

Finding a pair!

Matching shapes!

Matching shapes!

Not only was this a fun game for them to play, but it helped reinforce the idea of equal pieces and unequal pieces.

Review!

Review!

Afterwards, we used what we had practiced during the game and completed a review worksheet. The students got a piece of paper with shapes on it and, just like they had seen in the games, had to split the shapes into EQUAL halves.

Fraction worksheet- can also be downloaded from link above!

Fraction worksheet- can also be downloaded from link above!

(This was similar to something they had to do on the pre-test, and after the games and practice, almost all of the students were now able to split into equal halves!!!)

Working hard!

Working hard!

It was great to see them take what they had just practiced and apply it to their worksheet.

 

Sorting in the older class!

Sorting in the older class!

My math mania students in the older grades also completed the same activity.

 

Is this correct?

Is this correct?

As an added challenge, they had to explain to their partner why or why not each shape belonged in a certain group. Then, I went around and they had to justify it to me! Finally, these students continued onto more challenging sorts with shapes that were split into more pieces than just halves.

Question of the Day:

What’s your favorite way to teach fractions? Do you have certain lessons that the kids love?

One of my favorite ways to teach fractions is using play-doh. Check back later to see us use play-doh to split shapes into fractions later! 😉

 

 

 

 

 

I Need Letter

need

 

Way back in March (seems like forever ago doesn’t it!?), one of my students pencil sharpeners broke. Instantly he was up at the front of the room waiting patiently tugging on my sleeve to show me. 😉

I told him to remind me later and I would write a letter home for him telling his parents he needed a new one. Well, the day passed and as they were walking out the door, he shouts, “Ms. Tasch! You said you’d write a note about my sharpener!” Ah! The school day had slipped by so fast and I had completely forgotten! I ran to my desk, tripped over a chair, grabbed a post-it, and scribbled a barely legible note about his broken sharpener, hoping he’d be able to decipher it for his folks.

But, the whole incident got me thinking… I wish I had something easy to grab that let parents know (in a polite way) that their child needed a new supply. Parents send in so much in the beginning of the year and I have a hard time asking for more. So, either I don’t ask and go buy something myself, or the child ends up sharing with others. This had to change! So, I immediately sat down (or more accurately, I sat down the next day while my students were at gym) and typed up a quick letter, which can be found here:

Supply Letter (FREE!)

I tried to keep it simply and to the point, with the cute rhyme: “”I’ve been working hard in school, each and everyday. But I’ve run out of these supplies, would you please send some my way?” Then I added pictures of various supplies and a space to write in a supply that isn’t pictured. I print one off, made some copies, and put them by the students mailboxes. Then, when a student tells me they lost/broke/ran out of something, you just circle what they need and send it home! It works great in my first grade room and by the end of the year, kids were able to fill out the forms themselves.

I posted the letter on Pinterest and TpT and didn’t think much about it. But in just a few weeks, it had been re-pinned on Pinterest a few thousand times. Pretty cool! As the months passed, the repinning continued, and now it’s at over 15,000 repins. I’m so glad other people love it and can use it in their classrooms as well!

Question: Do you keep other forms ready to be passed out daily/weekly/monthly? What forms are they and what do you use them for?

I also keep forms by my mailboxes that tell parents about who is the student of the week. On Fridays, I just grab a form, fill out the students name, and pop it in their mailbox. All the directions are on the form and tell the parents what they need to do for “student of the week”, so it’s handy to have them pre-ready!

 

True/False Sorting Game

Like I said last post, it’s important to make kids think critically about things (Higher Order Thinking Skills) and apply their knowledge in different situation. When you do this, you go beyond simply memorizing answers. And…. it’s fun! (Something I spend a lot of time talking to my students about is perseverance– a skill they need to be taught. Kids need to learn that it’s okay (and usually good!) to take your time, try your best, and never give up!)

On a related side note- yesterday my Math Mania students in my 2nd grade class warmed-up with an AWESOME i-pad game called MathLands. It’s a free app that challenges students with math puzzles. We played 3 levels of the “Tower of Hanoi” puzzle and the kids accomplished all 3! It was a great time to talk about perseverance- as some kids groaned “This is too hard!”. 🙂 But, we never gave up and the kids finished all 3 puzzles. 🙂

But, let’s get back on track!

Yesterday we applied what we knew about greater than and less than and thought about it in a new way. We looked at number comparison sentences, some of which were correct (true) and some of which were wrong (false). The students worked together to read each number sentence and sort it into 2 groups: true or false.

Sorting

Sorting

This type of skill makes students think critically about the number sentence. Is it true? Why? Is it false? Why?

These are true

These are true

They have to use what they know and analyze the comparisons.

 

Almost done

Almost done

After we sorted, we went through each one and checked our answers. If something was on the wrong side, we’d fix it and explain why it should be moved. Then, I mixed them all up and we played again!

 

Working like a team

Working like a team

Sorting the sentences

Sorting the sentences

After playing in a whole group, students split into small teams and practiced sorting different number comparison sentences. Since we had just modeled this together, they knew exactly what to do and were able to practice this skill with their partners. After the small group practice, we moved to a worksheet that practiced the same skill.

 

From whole group, to small group, to individual practice!

From whole group, to small group, to individual practice!

Just like in our games, the students had to use the number comparison sentences and sort them into the two categories. This is also a great assessment tool for me: who understands this concept and who still needs support? This final check was a great way to see the students “put together all the pieces” and see them use their understanding in new ways. It was a very fun day and the kids had a great time!

I hope you all have a great, long weekend and I’ll see everyone back here on Monday. We’ll be starting a new topic next week!

Rollin’, Rollin’, Rollin’ (practicing greater than, less than, and equal to)

Hello again!

Welcome back to see how else we’ve been rocking and rolling while learning about greater than, less than, and equal to. Since this is a skill most of the kids understand, it’s important to practice it in different ways that cause them to think in new ways and apply their knowledge to the given situation. For example, most of these kiddos can look at two numbers and fill in the correct symbol. But what if they have to be the ones who find the numbers themselves, AND fill in the correct symbol?

That’s just what we did to practice. Sitting in a large circle on the floor, I tossed (quite accurately I might add) a large foam dice to a student. I asked the student to roll the dice and tell us the number. (As soon as the big dice came out, the kids were instantly excited! Big versions of things are always more fun! 😉 ) We wrote down the first number- 3. That student passed the dice to another student, who also rolled and told us the number-2. Writing this number on the board, we looked at what we had created- the number 32. We had our first number! We repeated the process (2 more dice rolls) to create the next number- which turned out to be 61. Then, a student came up to the board and filled in the correct symbol for us, explaining that 32 is less than 61.

After more group practice, the students were ready to play this by themselves. They each got a small foam dice (which they were very upset about, “I want a big dice!” 🙁 ) and soon got to work! The kids rolled 2 times to build each number and then compared them using <, >, or =.

Rolling Numbers

Rolling Numbers

Can you see the concentration? 🙂

Rollin', rollin', rollin'

Rollin’, rollin’, rollin’

Teacher tip: It’s a good idea to go over “dice rolling” rules before you start this activity, unless you want twenty foam dice flying through the air! A quick reminder of rolling on the table (not the sky), dice stay in your hands (not hitting your neighbors), and dice belong on the table (not your mouth) can solve a lot of problems before they begin.

Rolling and writing

Rolling and writing

This activity helped students connect more with the idea of greater than, less than, and equal to. Because they are building the numbers themselves, they have a better number sense and understanding of the place value. It engages them to work hard, build numbers, and compare them using the symbols.

Concentrating and having fun!

Concentrating and having fun!

How did this work for my students who need more of a challenge? We built 3 digit numbers of course! Comparing 3 digit numbers is a skill I noticed (after pre-assessing them) that they were struggling with. So, this is something we needed to practice. We started the same way- sitting in a circle rolling the big foam dice. Only this time, we rolled 3 times to build a 3 digit number. We repeated the process to compare two 3 digit numbers. The students also rolled 3 times on their own, using their small dice.

Making 3 digit numbers

Making 3 digit numbers

This helps them practice a more difficult skill and get a better sense of the place value each number represents.

What's that number?

What’s that number?

Another small change that helps challenge them, is giving them dice with dots. My younger students rolled dice with numbers written. Giving students dice with dots presents a slightly more visual challenge and allows them to practice quick counting skills.

We’re having a rollin’ good time in math class this summer! Don’t forget to check back to see all the fun!

 

Mr. Alligator Open Wide (and chomp, chomp, chomp!)

Please tell me someone else had that song stuck in their head all day too? Just me? 🙂

I hope the students came home singing their little hearts out of our Mr. Alligator song! It’s the perfect, silly way to remember that Mr. Alligator doesn’t eat pizza or mashed potatoes- only numbers! And at eatin’ time, he only wants to eat the number that is greater! One student said, “Wow, he must be a hungry gator!” Yes, he is!

Can you tell we’ve been learning about greater than, less than, and equal to this week? The students have all been comparing numbers using the symbols <, >, or =. On Monday, we started by reviewing the symbols and what they meant. After a quick pre-assessment, about half of the students knew the names of the symbols and could use them correctly in a number comparison sentence.

We started off with the Mr. Alligator song, which can be found here: Mr. Alligator song page and puppet. (You can download the song as an MP3)

***Update- this isn’t a page/song I’ve made myself. I found it online, which is what the above link connects to. You can can click on the below picture of the page to link to the printable. I don’t have the link for the song any longer. You could look it up on Youtube!***

 

 

 

 

 

I always print off copies of the song for the students and first, we read it together like a poem. After a couple of read throughs (and giggles), I tell them I have a surprise (at which point, their eyes get very wide and it suddenly gets quiet in the room- they LOVE surprises), and announce, “This poem is actually…… a song we can sing!” (Ok so it’s not the most exciting surprise in the world, but they do love the song, I promise! 🙂 ) We sing the song together quite a few times and then the students get to color in the little alligators in the pictures.

Song and Puppet

Song and Puppet

Next, it’s puppet making time! The link above also includes the picture for the greater than/ less than alligator puppet. You can cut it to make the puppet, but I just had the kids fold it, which worked even easier. After they fold it together, I call students over to a table, where I tape in a straw because I forgot to buy Popsicle sticks  to the inside and then tape the sides closed. (I’ve had kids glue the sides shut before, and even glue in the stick, but it never really stayed and we couldn’t use them until they dried. I’ve since found that clear tape works just fine!)

Then, it was time to practice! I wrote number sentences on the board and students had to come up and use their Mr. Alligator to compare.

27 is less than 80

27 is less than 80

The student up front becomes the “teacher” and they have to show the right answer using their puppet. Then, the “teacher” calls on a student to read the comparison, “Twenty seven is less than eighty”. If the student gets it correct, they then come up to the board, become the next “teacher”, and have to answer a new comparison question.

 

Looking for a "student" to call on

Looking for a “student” to call on

It’s a fun way to practice greater than and less than, AND helps kids remember the difference between the two symbols.

4 is greater than 1

4 is greater than 1

How is this being differentiated for my older students/students who need more of a challenge? I found that most students can compare 1 digit numbers, many can compare 2 digit numbers, but most were struggling when comparing 3 digit numbers. So, my Math Mania students/older students compared number sentences more like this:

 

3 digit number comparisons

3 digit number comparisons

You can see how we talked about looking at the first place (the hundreds place), moving on the the tens place, and finally the ones place. It’s just like putting something in ABC order, which we made a connection to. Once we started breaking down these three digit numbers, it became easier for them to compare.

Great job!

Great job!

Check back to see what else we’ve done with this topic!

 

Woof! Non-standard “dog-bone” measuring!

I hope you enjoyed what my first 2 classes did to wrap-up the non-standard unit measuring week (remember measuring “Ms. Tasch”? 😉 )

Later that day with my older students, we also finished our time learning about non-standard measuring. To switch things up for them (and challenge them), we did a different activity that made them creatively think and find things around the room that were the length of a dog bone (and by dog bone, I of course mean a paper dog bone that they cut out of nice, clean paper!)

Each student got 10 dog bones that they needed to cut out. (It worked out so perfect because of course I had forgotten plastic baggies for them to put them in because during art that day, they had made bus tags using lanyards and plastic holders. Voila! These plastic holders doubled as instant “dog bone” holders.)

Cutting out the bones

Cutting out the bones

The students worked very hard- and so nicely- while they cut out their bones. I put on music for us to listen to as they worked, to which they told me that they felt like “boogie-ing” 🙂

After they cut out their measuring units, they were ready to work! The worksheet asked them to find things around the room that were 2 bones long, 5 bones long, 8 bones long, etc. So, they had to walk around, find something to measure, and see how many bones it was.

How many bones long is that bench?

How many bones long is that bench?

If they found something the correct number of bones, they wrote it down on their sheet. (Teacher tip: This also helps them practice estimation. They need to think critically about which objects will be a certain length. A student should estimate that that bench isn’t going to be 2 bones and won’t be 30 bones. This activity helps them realize how to make good estimations)

They also had to use the bones to measure certain objects, like a pencil…

Measuring

Measuring

and a table…

 

How many?

How many?

and of course remember to record all their answers…

 

Writing it down!

Writing it down!

The kids had a blast finding objects around the room and using these fun measuring units. I liked this activity because it helped them think critically, record results, and measure using non-standard units.

Teachers, this activity and more can be found at my TpT store in this bundle: Measurement Bundle

This week we’re working on number comparisons- greater than, less than, and equal to. Have a great Monday!

Measure Ms. Tasch

How fast did that weekend go by? It’s amazing how you can get so many things done in such a short amount of time! I spent my weekend with family- 2 graduation parties on Saturday and father’s dad on Sunday. It was the perfect weather to sit by the pool, grill, and relax (and laugh) with the people you love!

I didn’t get a chance to share what else we did in measurement last week. We were working on non-standard unit measurement (using things to measure that weren’t made to measure, like cubes, coins, dominoes, etc). During the school year, I had done this activity with my first graders, and it was a big hit, so I thought I’d give it a try during summer school for 2 of the classes. I gathered the students around the white board and after reviewing what non-standard measurement was, told them that today, we’d be measuring me- Ms. Tasch! The kids laughed, giggled, and rolled around, asking, “For real!?” I told them I had drawn smaller “Ms. Tasch’s” that they would be measuring using a variety of non-standard units.:)

To begin, they sat in groups and got their recording worksheets.

Next, they made a prediction of how many units they thought it would take to measure from the bottom of their “Ms.Tasch’s” toes to the top of their “Ms. Tasch’s” head. (Teacher tip: This activity could have easily been used to teach perimeter as well. In fact, some groups started out by putting their units around the edges of the person drawing. We had to stop to explain that we were measuring the height- toes to head- but for older students, they could measure height and perimeter).

Measuring using crayons!

Measuring using crayons!

We did the first unit together- crayons. We walked through making a “good” prediction and how to put the units in a line (touching, not overlapping) to get the measurement. After they got the unit in place, they counted how many it took. The kids did such a great job counting the units together like a team and writing down the answer.

Working like a team!

Working like a team!

After they finished the first unit-crayons- they raised their hands and I’d give them their choice of a next unit.

Measuring!

Measuring!

Some students used dominoes….

IMG_1466Or coins…

Measuring!

Measuring!

 

or shape blocks, fraction squares, dice, number tiles, etc (I was so busy watching and switching units between groups that I didn’t take pictures of those- sorry!) The kids loved this activity because it was fun and silly to measure their teacher. I loved this activity because it was an engaging, hands-on way for them to practice what we had been learning about all week. The kids showed their understanding of measuring using non-standard units and were able to record their results.

After, we sat in a group and talked about our answers. Not all groups used all the same materials, so groups shared out what they used and how many it took to measure “Ms. Tasch”. We also talked about if our predictions were close (why or why not) and why some groups answers were different, even if they used the same materials (I took the blame for this one… since I simply draw the oh-so-wonderful Ms. Tasch’s myself, they were close to the same size, but not perfectly similar. Oops!)

For teachers out there, check out my TpT store for this activity bundle, found here: Measurement Bundle

I’ll make another post next about what my other class did to wrap-up measurement! 🙂

 

Summer School Begins!

Summer school has officially started and we’re already off to a great and fun start! Our program has grown so much this year- last year the ENTIRE program consisted of only about twenty students, now the program at our school has around eighty! That’s a big change, but it’s been great and I’ve really enjoyed getting to know all the kids. I’m still working on all the new names, but I think I’ve almost got it! 😉

Because I’m seeing such a wide range of age levels for this math program (Pre-K students through 2nd grade), each class is focusing on the same topic, but in very different ways. My class is also a combination of Math Mania (students who need a challenge or want to keep up with their math skills) and Math Boost (students who might need additional support), so there is also differentiation within each class as well.

A huge thanks to the parents who filled out and returned the “Getting to Know you” form. Since summer school is only 5 weeks, I wanted to be able to know as much as I could about your child. That way, I can best help him or her!

Let’s dive right in! To begin each class, we spend about 5-10 minutes warming up with a math I-pad game. It’s a good way to turn on our “math brains” and transition into our classroom.

Finish the pattern!

Finish the pattern!

The students take turns coming up to select the right answer, and the other students can see and learn as well!

 

Finding the answer!

Finding the answer!

After our warm up, we move onto the topic of the day. This week we’ve been focusing on measurement. I love to start with this topic because it’s very hands-on and relateable. Even my little Pre-K friends love being able to tell how many “cubes” an object is or which object is longer or shorter. We started off by using cubes to measure things around the room. Students got 8 cubes and a measuring worksheet. They had to find things around the room that were 1 cube long, 2 cubes long, 3 cubes long, etc. The students were so focused and excited as they moved around the room, exploring to see what measurements they could find!

How many cubes in that water bottle?

How many cubes in that water bottle?

This is also a fun activity to do at the beginning of the program because it gets the kids familiar with the room and where things are. But mostly I love it because it’s hands-on math! The kids are learning through “doing”.

Hmm how many cubes in my backpack?

Hmm how many cubes in my backpack?

As the students explored the room, they recorded the things they found on their worksheet.

 

Writing down what she found

Writing down what she found

The students measure anything and everything! They found such creative things to measure, and did a very nice job at sharing their ideas with their friends.

Measuring part of the stool

Measuring part of the stool

This was a very fun way to introduce measuring using non-standard units. Check back to see what we measured next!

 

Adventure to Fitness Re-post and Summer School

Is everyone enjoying their summer vacation as much as I am? It’s only been 5 days, but those 5 days have been jam packed! I’ve been to summer school training, out with friends, family parties, visiting my new nephew, and packing up my classroom. Today I have my book club, which leads me to the point of this post…

 

I had picked the book for our club to read this month (Z: A novel of Zelda Fitzgerald- a great read which I’d recommend!) and I was just Googling some discussion questions for us to talk about tonight. Throughout reading this book, I often found myself grabbing my phone to look up pictures of Zelda or Scott or their daughter Scottie. I always knew a basic outline of their lives, but in reading the novel, I wanted to see more/learn more/read more about them. Naturally, today was no different as I was looking up discussion questions- I quickly got distracted (doesn’t this always happen?) and veered  towards Google image searching them. Then, just as naturally, I began image searching other people I know (please tell me I’m not alone in doing this? 🙂 )

 

After laughing at the pictures that came up for different people I know, I decided to image search myself and see what came up (again, such a logical next step 😉 ) The first image was from my Pinterest account and the second image was one I thought would lead to this blog. When I clicked on it, however, it took me to the Adventure to Fitness website- a website I’ve blogged about before and love to use in my classroom.  Much to my surprise, I saw my blog post on their site, along with many others, to show how you can use it in the classroom. Here is the post from the website: Adventure to Fitness Spotlight. Kinda cool right? I liked reading about the ways other teachers or families use it as well!  Here is my original post about this website (in case ya missed it!): Original Adventure to Fitness Blog Post

 

Stay tuned because summer school begins Tuesday! I’m teaching math as part of the Enrichment Academy, a program that helps challenge and engage students. It’s a rotating day, so I’ll see each group for about an hour and then the kids move through other classes that teach reading, P.E., and cooking/art. I had such a blast last year and I know I’ll have fun again this summer! Have a great Friday!!! 🙂