Total Participation- Thumbs Up/Thumbs Down

Hello, hello and welcome to a beautiful Tuesday morning! I have plans later today to meet my mom and sisters to pick up part of my wedding dress (the belt!) and go out for lunch. The weather is great here today and I’m very excited πŸ™‚

What I’ve been up to…

Yesterday, my oldest sister and I (and baby Lucas) went to O’hare to pick up my other sister and her husband. They’ve been in Asia for the past couple weeks and it was great seeing them and hearing about their trip. Here’s the pic I snapped of them in the car ride back to Chipotle home.

 

Welcome home!

Welcome home!


We went back to their house and spent a lot of time playing with this little man…


Nap time!

Nap time!



Isn’t he getting so big!? (And such a cutie! πŸ™‚ )

What I’ve been up to (school wise)…

I’m really trying to enjoy these last few weeks of summer because August 15th is going to creep up on me before I know it. I went into school last week to see my new classroom (we got a very large new addition put on during last school year and I’m LUCKY enough to have a brand new classroom in that wing!) It was more than I could have ever imagined and right after leaving the school, I went straight to the teaching store to get some things laminated that I’d been working on.

QR Codes

I’ve become obsessed about QR codes (QR codes are those black pixel box thingys- I’m very technical- that you can scan with your phone or iPad that bring you directly to the site. QR stands for quick response. You can download a free app called “QRreader” to scan these things.)

My sister-in-law had gone to a conference a while back and told me about how they had given the teachers several ideas on how to use them in the classroom. Of course I took this information and stole itΒ used it in some different ways.

QR code

QR code

Here’s an example of a QR code I made. I always start the school year off by talking to the kids about what they want to be when they grow up, and from there we talk about how they will get to this through working hard, staying in school, and going to college. I made this QR code over a picture of the college I went to to display with our projects they will make. When scanned, it will take you right to UWW’s website.

Making QR codes could not be easier. I don’t know what I expected, but I thought it would be hard… well, I’m here to tell you that it isn’t! After some quick searching, I found 2 easy, fun websites.

QR maker

QR maker is a very easy, straightforward website. It walks you through the steps, 1 being selecting the type of media it is, 2 being entering the URL, and 3 being downloading the code it makes. It’s that easy!

QR maker with picture

This QR maker is slightly (and I mean only slightly) harder to do, but it’s the one I used above with the picture in the background. With this one you need to create an account or login with Facebook. Then the process is the same (choose media type and enter URL) until the next page. It will give you tons of different pictures you can use as a background or you can upload your own. All I did was go to the UWW website, save one of their pictures to my computer, and then upload it on this website. After you’ve got the picture you want, you can drag, re-size, and move the QR code anywhere you want on the background picture. Click “generate”, then “next”, and you’re done! This site gives you the option to pay for a better quality one, but I’ve used the free one several times and it always look just fine to me!

I’m thinking I’m going to QR code this blog for my parents on newsletters and also send home other QR codes on websites I want them to visit at home. Many of my students don’t have computers at home, but all their parents or family members have phones that can scan! I’m thinking of making codes for YouTube videos on letters or sounds I want them to practice or other games they can use at home!

Total Participation- Thumbs Up and Down

At our school, we always read a book over the summer or during the school year on something we want to focus on as a staff. Last year it was all about different total participation techniques– ways or activities you can use in the classroom to get all students engaged and involved. It was great to see new ideas and I tried many of them in my classroom each week. One of the best ideas, in my opinion, was giving the students answer or response cards to hold up. In my class, we do a lot of one student coming up to the board to point to the answer or letter. The rest of the kids really wanted a turn too, but rarely paid attention to anything except who was being called on (sound familiar? just me? Bueller?)

I started passing out index cards and having the kids write responses on them to hold up for the right answer. For example, if I had written the vowels on the board, the kids would get index cards and write a vowel on each one. Then I still had a student go up and identify the sound or letter, but the rest of the students also had to hold up the correct response. What I saw was a dramatic increase in participation and engagement. This year, I knew I wanted more ideas like this.

A while back I’d pinned something on Pinterest that showed a Popsicle stick with a thumbs up on one side and a thumbs down on the other. I thought these could be great to laminate and keep in their cups on their desks to use for quick total participation responses. When I clicked on the picture however, it was only a picture and no link to the actual cards. So, I made some myself!

You can download them here for free:

THUMBS- FREEBIE!!

Thumbs up, thumbs down

Thumbs up, thumbs down

I based them off of the picture I had seen. I made tons of them, went to the store to get them laminated (to which the woman working said “Somebody’s been on Pinterest!” Busted πŸ™‚ ), and came home to get started putting them together.

Mess

Mess

Can you please tell me someone else’s house turns into a disaster zone during crafting projects too?

Trying to craft!

Trying to craft!

Not only did I have things everywhere (I was making several things in one sitting) but my lovely dogs did not seem to understand that they couldn’t walk all over these!) πŸ˜‰

Anyways, here’s what I used…

Materials

Materials

…the laminated cards, Popsicle sticks, and hot glue.

I took a stick, put glue on both sides near the top, on one side glued the thumbs up…

Yay!

Yay!

and on the other, glued the thumbs down.

Nay!

Nay!

I figured I can use them for things like voting, asking if something is the right answer, yes or no questions, and opinions. I’m going to put them in the kids cups (I Velcro cups to their desk where they put pencils, erasers, and scissors for quick access) so we can use them quickly and so I remember to use them! Because they are laminated, they should last a pretty long time.

We’re leaving for vacation on Saturday (so excited!) so expect to see some “classroom under construction” pictures the first week of August. I’m pretty amped to get in there and start setting up.

What things are you already making for your classroom?

I’ve made some sticks with numbers on them to pull for random answers and my QR codes. So far that’s about it, but I have some other ideas I want to get started with too!

Getting Things Ready…

With summer school over, I’m starting to look ahead to the upcoming school year. It’s an exciting time to thinkΒ  oh my gosh where has the summer gone! about all the new things you can do with a new batch of kiddos.

I know in my classroom, Daily 5 is a huge staple of what we do and will be started on the very first day. I still re-read the book about how to start the first lessons each year- doesn’t hurt to brush up- and know that we’ll be building our stamina in no time.

This year I’m thinking about projecting a timer to visually show the students our stamina, but I’m also not sure if that will help or hurt the process. Does anyone else use a timer the students can see as they are reading? On one hand, I think it could help promote stamina and motivate those squirrelly (totally a word)Β  students into sitting longer. On the other hand, I think it could be a huge distraction for others.

In the meantime, I’ve been creating some new things I want to use in my classroom next year. “Work on Writing” is an area I wanted more materials in, so I created this bundle:

writing pic

Writing Pack

to give myself and my students different writing opportunities. It includes recipe writing, writing cards, “when I grow up” writing, and more.

In my class, I’ve found it to work best by putting out 1 writing choice at a time. The students also have writing folders, so if they don’t finish, they put their writing in the folder. They can work on it more next time they choose work on writing. I’ve found it gives them a focus instead of them sitting around and thinking, “What am I going to write about today?” (I change the writing choice about once every other week)

I also made a “First Day of School” bundle. Sometimes I feel like the first day of school is looooooooong hard to fill with activities because the kids are so quiet and there’s so many procedure to go over. I put things in this pack that I’ve done before, are hands-on, and activities students can do alone or with partners. There are a few games and things that get them to get up and move around. (I’ve very excited about the play-doh sculpting activity!) It can be found on my TpT store, or the link below the picture.

1st Day!

1st Day!

1st Day of School Bundle!

This year is going to start before I know it (August 15th anyone?) and that means I’ll be having some upcoming posts about getting into my new classroom! Can’t wait!

Have a great rest of your Wednesday!

Summer School Wrap-Up

I hope everyone is having a lovely Tuesday! It’s hotter than anything outside today- and as a matter of fact, inside as well πŸ˜‰ – but we’re having fun and learning all the same!

Although we’re already in the swing of things around here, last weekend was just as busy for us! I spent Saturday morning at a Zumba fundraiser, raising money for a young boy with muscular dystrophy. It was 80’s themed and everyone had a blast dancing and sweating to the awesome throw-back tunes. Later in the day, Stephen and I walked over to his brother’s house- which is only a block over- to pick up his wife’s- my soon to be sister in law’s- bike. (I don’t have a bike, πŸ™ , but we were really in the mood to go for a bike ride) She is so nice and let me use hers! We rode around the neighborhood and set plans to go for a longer ride in the morning.

That night, we headed over to my other soon to be sister in law’s house for a bonfire!

Fire!

Fire!

Doesn’t that just scream SUMMER? They have been doing a lot of tree cutting and cleaning up of the back half of their yard which equals= wood to burn! It was great to sit around, relax, and enjoy the beautiful weather.

The next morning, we woke up bright and early, headed over to a nearby lake, and took our ride!

Ready!

Ready!

I haven’t ridden a bike in a very long time, but they don’t have the saying for nothing- once I got on, it was easy! We rode around the lake twice, for a total of about 6 and a half miles.

 

Pretty place for a ride!

Pretty place for a ride!

 

Not a bad way to start a Sunday, huh?

Summer School

Where have these last 5 weeks gone? It can’t possibly be the end of summer school already, can it!?

I feel as though we just started here, and yet tomorrow is our final day here this summer! We’ve had a lot of fun (and hard work) during this time together and I hope all the students got more practice in math skills, learned new things, and had fun trying! As we wrap up, we’ve spent these last few days doing some hands-on, exciting math activities that are perfect for the hot temps in the room πŸ™‚

Plane and Solid Shapes

On Monday, we talked about the differences between plane and solid shapes. (Plane shapes are flat- like squares, circles, and triangles, while solid shapes are 3-D, like cylinders, cones, and cubes) After sorting some shapes and talking about shapes we saw in the room, I told students they would be finding and sorting shapes themselves. I pointed to this table:

Messy, no?

Messy, no?

For weeks I’ve been saving all of our flyers, ads, and coupons for this activity. It’s been quite a pile laying around my house! (Teacher tip: A great resource to use for this would be all of those teacher supply magazine you get in the mail! I took one of them, removed the staples, and instantly had about 50 pages they could cut and use!) (Bonus teacher tip: Make sure to go through all the ads so you don’t have students breaking down in giggles when they see an underwear ad in a flyer πŸ™‚ )

Their job was simple, do through the pictures and find shapes that were plane and solid. Then, cut them out, and glue them down in the correct categories.

Looking and cutting

Looking and cutting

I just had them fold a piece of paper in half (you get what you get and you don’t get upset!) and label the halves.

Working

Working

What I didn’t realize until we started was how much background knowledge helped in their situation. Because all of these pictures (or most of these pictures) are flat, or plane, looking in the photographs, students had to be able to know that in real-life, they are solid.

For example, in real life an orange is a sphere, a solid shape. But in the food ad, it appears to be flat, like a circle. Students had to put their prior knowledge to good use!

Good ideas!

Good ideas!

Sorting

Sorting

Finding lots of solids!

Finding lots of solids!

Of course not every one was perfect, but that lead to lots of great discussions about how they decided their reasoning, what the object would be like in real life, and what category it should be in.

Looking great!

Looking great!

Who Can Make the Longest Chain?

On Tuesday, I wanted to do something that would instantly engage the kids and make the day fun! What’s more fun than a little competition? When you say the word “competition” to students, their eyes have laser focus and all their little ears point in your direction (or at least this is how I visualize it πŸ™‚ )

I gave each student 1 piece of small construction paper with these instructions- cut out strips of paper, glue them together to make a chain, and see who can make their chain the longest. I explained that we’re all using the same size paper, so it’s all about figuring out how to cut the paper to make it the longest.

They got started right away!

Cutting

Cutting

Some kids started cutting right away while others made a few different cuts at first, trying to see how their rings would look. Pretty quickly, some kids came up and asked to start over. To me, that’s fantastic because it means they are problem solving and have figured out a better way to do something.

Making chains!

Making chains!

 

 

I want to win!

I want to win!

 

During the whole process (we worked for about 35 minutes) the kids were always working, with the occasional break to hold up their chain and compare with their neighbors. It was fun to see them try to solve this problem and figure out how to make a long chain from the single piece of paper.

After we were all done, we lined the chains up on the floor…

All ready to measure!

All ready to measure!

And the winner was clear! The student with the brown chain towards the left of the picture was the winner! While there were a few others very close, his chain proved to be the longest!

Winner!

Winner!

He told the class he made long, skinny cuts to make big circles. He knew that with big circles, his chain would be long. Good thinking!

Cheese!

Cheese!

Although, with something as much fun as this, we all felt like winners!

Have a fantastic rest of your summer break! I hope you and your child had a great experience this year and stop by to say hi sometime!

The 4th, Adventures, and Telling Time Differentiation!

The fourth of July holiday flew by in a flash! I can’t believe it’s already over and we’re back at summer school. The 4th always seems like the middle point of the summer and since we start school this year in the middle of August, it will be here before we know it!

The 4th

The fourth started for me by weeding and watering our garden. Last year we planted everything from seeds and while some plants turned out fantastic, others did not. (The carrots and radishes were so sad looking πŸ™ ) This year we thought we’d be proactive and try planting the seeds inside first around March- as, I’d like to point out, most of the packets told us to do- and planted them after the last frost- again, as per instructions- but, disaster! (Maybe it’s me? πŸ˜‰

We didn’t let that stop us and went out to buy some starter plants. We got starters of tomatoes, broccoli, cabbage, and brussel sprouts.

Cabbage

Cabbage



How awesome does that look? ( if I say so myself πŸ˜‰ )

We planted aruggula, raddishes, sunflowers, beans, and carrots from seeds still and (knock on wood) they’ve all been growing like gang- busters! While all this rain doesn’t make me feel summer-y (totally a word), it does help my garden!

After gardening, I went over to my (soon-to-be) sister-in-laws and spent a few wonderful hours sitting outside in the warm sun, talking, and watching the girls play on their new playset.

Fun!

Fun!

Not gonna lie, it was so cool that I had to play on it myself πŸ™‚

The evening ended with us in downtown Kenosha watching the fireworks lakeside. It was such a nice night and the show was great!

The Dells

The next day, the fiance and I packed up the car and the dogs and hit the road for the Dells. My sister and her family, along with my parents, were already up there so we were anxious to join the crew and see this little man…

Luke

Luke

He’s cuter every time I see him πŸ™‚

The weekend was filled with eating (yum)…

BBQ

BBQ

long walks…

So pretty!

So pretty!

and pool time. Then this happened….

Oh hey new puppy!

Oh hey new puppy!

We were taking a walk along the river and as we got back in the car, we saw this adorable dog walking through the parking lot. I immediately jumped out and called for it, and she came right over. She seemed very friendly so we picked her up and began looking for anyone around who might have lost her (she had a collar but no tags). After about 10 minutes of looking, we took her to the local police station. They said they’d hold her for the day and then send her to a local shelter. Of course we’d already fallen in love with her at that point, and while we were totally hoping her owners would pick her up, were also secretly hoping we’d get to keep her. In the end, we called back the next day and she’d been picked up! 4th of July miracle!

Telling Time Differentiation

Back to school! Last Wednesday, we were wrapping up our unit on telling time. The kids had a good understanding of the concept and we’d spent a day playing different review games to practice time. As the final project, I wanted to do something that would give them flexibility and allow them to creatively show their understanding. I thought back to the class I just finished taking for my Master’s degree about differentiation. A huge part of differentiating is about giving students a choice in how they show their knowledge and letting them explore in how they show something. Since we’d been playing time games, I thought a great final project would be for students to create their OWN games about telling time. This would include:

1. Students using materials to make up a new game about telling time.

2. Students applying their knowledge and understanding of time to a new situation.

3. Students creatively showing their understanding.

and 4. Students practice orally explaining directions and rules to others.

I set up a table in the room with tons of stuff: paper, scissors, glue, tape, play-doh, paper plates, sticks, straws, clocks, dice, shapes, and crayons. I explained the directions and encouraged students to use anything to make up a new game that practiced telling time. They could do this alone, with a partner, or with a group. They were off!

Picking materials

Picking materials

Most kids started with things they thought were cool, like the play-doh or straws, but as they worked, they moved back and forth between the supplies and their work tables to either put back or get new things.

 

Working hard

Working hard

Planning

Planning

Right away I could see how engaged the kids were. They all got started working instantly and all had a set “plan”. Some kids made their own clocks, some kids made up board games, and some came up with other ideas all together! Here was one I found very creative….

Β 

Fractions

Fractions

In her game, she set the clock to a time- like 4 o’clock and the other person had to split the play-doh into that many pieces- 4. It was so creative and combined clocks and fractions, which we had just learned about.

Clocks

Clocks

Making games

Making games

The kids worked for about 30 minutes, and in that time, created wonderful and fantastic games! Then, they presented their games to each other.

Here's my game...

Here’s my game…

 

Presenting

Presenting

The games were all awesome! Some kids made up a “Simon Says” game, where the person says a time and the other people have to make the time, only if “Simon Says”, of course.Β  Another kid made a detailed rolling game, involving dice and the clocks.

Games!

Games!

Another game was about making a time and picking up that many pieces of play-doh.

All in all, it was such a fun, differentaited way for the kids to show their knowledge and use that knowledge to make something new. It helped them creatively think, explain their thinking, and of course- have fun!

I hope you enjoyed this post and are looking forward to our next one- this week’s all about ADDITION!

Telling Time Game Day

This week we’ve spent time telling time. πŸ™‚

We used mini clocks, digital clocks, big clocks, and more to tell time to the hour, half hour, and in 5 minute increments. (A first grade Common Core skill is for students to be able to tell time to the hour and half hour. A second grade Common Core skill is to tell time to 5 minute marks.)

On Tuesday, we had a telling time game day. I thought of games I knew and searched Pinterest (of course) to make a list of different games to review telling time. We spent the day cycling through the various game, some of which were played as a whole class, some with partners, and some in small groups. Each game used different materials, but were all very easy to set up and explain. Most importantly, each helped them practice a time telling skill!

I-Pad Clock Game

The first game we started with was a telling time I-pad game- if you search “telling time” into an iPhone or iPad the first app that should come up is the one we used. It’s called “Interactive Telling Time” (I downloaded the lite free version) and the kids love being able to set the time to the correct time it asks for.

Setting the time

Setting the time

I Have, Who Has

“I Have, Who Has” is one of my favorite games for any subject area. It causes students to be good listeners and active participates. Also, it can be used in any subject or any topic. It’s basically a chain game, all students have different cards,Β  one student starts off with a question, and a different student with the right card answers. For example, since our game was about telling time, all the students had different cards with times on them. The first student said, “I have the first card. Who has 1:00?” The student with that card says, “I have 1:00. Who has 3:30?” So on and so on. All the kids had more than one card so they had to pay close attention to what others were saying so they didn’t miss their turn.

I have, who has

I have, who has

We sat in a circle to play. After we played through once, I timed them to see how fast they could get through the whole game. Then, we timed it again to see if we could go any faster! This classes winning time was 2 minute and 20 seconds (which, by the way, was the fastest of any of the classes that played that day! #winning! πŸ˜‰ ) It’s a great game to practice telling time, thinking, and listening. (P.S. SO many of these games can be downloaded for FREE through Pinterest or TeachersPayTeachers. I got mine from Pinterest for free and it worked great!)

Roll A Time

After that, we moved around a little and formed groups of 3. This worked out perfect for the amount of students we had, but this game could also be played in partners too. In each group, one student was the “dice roller”, one student was the “time maker”, and one student was the “checker”. The student who was the dice roller had a dice (obviously!), the student who was the time maker had a clock, and the checker only needed their eyeballs. πŸ˜‰

They each have a different job

They each have a different job

(To be honest, I didn’t think about assigning specific jobs until the kids started to run up to grab walk to get the materials. It was quickly apparent that giving them each a job to start, and then rotating the jobs through the game, was the best way to start) To play the game, the dice roller rolls the dice. In the above picture you can see he rolled a 6. Then, the clock maker has to make that o’clock time using the clock, so 6:00. After they make the time, they clock maker has to show the “checker”. If they are correct, they all rotate their materials and get a new job.

Rolling, telling time, and checking!

Rolling, telling time, and checking!

I took a video of some students in action:

IMG_1621

Scoot- Telling Time

I don’t know where I’ve been (under a rock apparently), but I missed the “scoot” bandwagon somewhere! As I was searching different clock games, I kept coming across people talking about a “scoot” game and different ways to use it in class. Curiosity got the best of me and I immediately began Googling this elusive “scoot” game. What I found was that scoot is any kind of game you play where students do something (an activity, answer sheet, question) at a desk or table, and then scoot to the next seat or table to answer/play/complete the next thing.

So I jumped right on the bandwagon, used what I had, and put together a scootin’ game of my own! At each table, I alternated between putting a clock and a laminated worksheet. The worksheet can be downloaded here Clock Worksheets (FREE!)Β  and all I did was put them inside of clear plastic writing sleeves. That way, they could be written on with dry erase marker. The worksheets have space for students to write a digital time and an analog time. Along with this worksheet, I put a dry erase marker and an eraser.

To play, the students start at a seat. I called out a time, “5 o’clock!” and the kids get busy making that time. If they are sitting at a seat with a clock, they make the hands say the correct time and hold it up in the sky. If they are sitting by a worksheet, they have to use the marker to make 5 o’clock on the digital clock and the analog clock, then hold it up in the sky.

Playing the scoot game
You can see the kids with the clocks holding them up and the kids at the writing seats making the times.

Ready!

Ready!

After everyone has the time up, I say “Ready……” and that’s their signal to put down their materials, erase their boards, and get ready…. to scoot!

Telling time!

Telling time!

When I call out “Scoot!” they quickly move to the next seat at the table. The game keeps rotating this way, the kids make a time, hold it up, get ready, and scoot to the next place.

(Cute story, one of my other classes was playing this and thought I was saying “shoo”, so as they moved to the next seat, they moved their hands at each other saying “Hurry! Shoo! Shoo! Shoo!” It was very cute!)

Being a Clock

We wrapped up the game day by playing “Being a clock”. I used my big yellow clock to show a time and the students had to use their arms to make the time. It was a fun, silly way to end our games and review different times.

MAKE SURE to check back next week when I post what we did today- the students made their own games to practice telling time…. it was GREAT!

Have a wonderful, fun, awesome Fourth of July! We’ll see you back next Monday!

Fraction Self- Portraits

Happy Monday! I hope your week is off to a great start and you feel productive and ready to face the week! πŸ™‚

My weekend felt very long and was filled with family, food, and great weather! We finally got some sunny days without being too hot to be outside. So on Sunday, we decided to go to a local forest preserve to enjoy the sunshine, take a walk, and grab some lunch.

Me and the fiance

Me and the fiance

We ordered our food and as we sat waiting for it, around the corner came 2 familiar faces- my sister, her husband, and my new little nephew! It was such a fun surprise and a huge coincidence to run into them there! It was great spending a couple hours with them, sitting on the deck on the lake, eating lunch, and enjoying the breeze.

Sister and bro-in-law

Sister and bro-in-law

Then this happened…

Cherry Sno-Cone

Cherry Sno-Cone

I mean really, how can you not want to get a Sno-Cone when it’s a beautiful summer day out!? My sister and I each got one; I dripped it all over myselfΒ  I ate it very neatly and enjoyed every frozen bite. πŸ˜‰

Summer School

Last week I promised to talk about how my Math Mania upper class finished the week on fractions. They had already practiced splitting shapes into different fractions and all did a great job understanding equal pieces. I started thinking about a fun project I could create for them that would use everything they had learned about fractions and help them understand the different pieces that make up a “whole” fraction. After searching on Pinterest for a while, I found ideas for fraction people. I adjusted it slightly to be fraction “portraits”, created the writing worksheet, and we were ready to go!

My example

My example

As you can see, I cut up a bunch of different colored construction paper. I just took a bunch of multicolored paper and (using a paper cutter) cut (about) 1 inch strips. Then I went back with the strips and cut 1 inch pieces. Some pieces are bigger or smaller, but overall, most were close.

Then, I started making “me”. I used different colors and made a face, hair, and upper body. I used a marker to make the eyes, nose, and mouth. (I do realize how much it also looks like a Lego person…. that’s just an added bonus!)

The kids did the same thing.Β  Of course there were questions about if they could make any kind of person (blue hair, purple skin, etc), but I told them to try to make them look like themselves- since it was a self- portrait. But, you really could have them make anything, a monster, an alien, other people, whatever works. After explaining the project to them, I told them to make sure to use different colors because we’d be using this to do “fraction practice”. A student raised her hand and asked, “But how?”. “You’ll see!” was my reply! With that, they were off!

 

Making a fraction self portrait

Making a fraction self portrait

Looking good!

Looking good!

Starting to come together

Starting to come together

 

The hair is so cute, right?

The hair is so cute, right?

After they had gotten the pieces into place, they got a glue stick and glued them down (Teacher tip: Have the students put on the pieces WITHOUT gluing first. That way, they can move them up or down if they need more space. It will make it much easier in the long run!)

Starting to glue

Starting to glue

Putting the pieces together

Putting the pieces together

After their portraits were done, I passed out the fraction project worksheets. The kids had to figure out how many pieces made up their “whole”. For example, my portrait was 47 pieces, so my “whole” was 47/47. Then, they had to break down the fraction amount of each color they used. In my portrait, I used 3 pink pieces. So the fraction of pink was 3/47. I used 19 red pieces. That fraction was 19/47.

Figuring out the fractions!

Figuring out the fractions!

It was their job to figure out the fraction of each color they used. (This could easily be extended to teach about percentages too!)

Finished!

Finished!

All done!

All done!

To finish, the students glued the writing paper onto a piece of construction paper, and then we stapled the 2 papers together.

IMG_1595

How cute are all of those? πŸ™‚

This was a really fun project that helped the students better understand the idea of a “whole” fraction and how different fractions add up to the whole. It could be adapted and changed to fit different age levels or abilities. Try it in your classroom and see how it goes!