Plane Shapes

Hello! It is Wednesday (the Wednesday before spring break…. not that I’m keeping track or anything) and as I was looking through my phone today, I realized I needed to post about our new math unit- Geometry!

Our district math team divided up a few different Common Core standards for this unit, including plane and solid shapes, composite shapes, fractions, and telling time. Whew! It’s going to be a long unit, but a good one and we’ve already dived right in.

For starters, we reviewed 2-D plane shapes last week. We started by making the shapes out of play-doh.

Shapes

Shapes

I would call out a plane shape and the students created it. They had a lot of fun rolling, shaping, and making the shapes! It was really hands-on and fun!

Shapes

Shapes

Shapes

Shapes

After we’d made the shape, we talked about how many sides and vertices (corners) it has. This was a great way to introduce the math vocabulary words!

Shapes

Shapes

The next day, it was time for a shape hunt! In the past, we’ve done shape hunts where the students go around and write down different shapes they find around the room. It’s always been fun and something the kids enjoyed doing. But this year, we’re trying to incorporate technology more in the classroom. In a team meeting, one of the first grade teachers said she saw on Pinterest (where else?) that you could have the students go on a picture room hunt, where they work together to take pictures of shapes they see with an iPad.

I loved the idea and knew I’d be using in with my kiddos!

So, I put the kids into groups of 3-4 students. With 6 iPads, it’s great to be able to put them in these small, manageable groups.

Each group was assigned one plane shape to look for, meaning we had one circle group, one star group, one rectangle group, one triangle group, one oval group, and one square group.

The groups were told to walk around the room together and take turns taking photographs of the shape they were assigned to find.

Photo hunt

Photo hunt

Photo hunt

Photo hunt

Photo hunt

Photo hunt

Photo hunt

Photo hunt

The kids were totally engaged. They were able to walk around as a team and find examples of the shape they were looking for. It was really amazing to see them look at things with a critical math “eye” and responsibly takes the pictures.

Photo hunt

Photo hunt

We didn’t stop there!

Part of incorporating technology is MORE than just using it. The kids need to be able to create and present with it.

Enter the app- Storehouse!

Storehouse

Storehouse

It’s a FREE visual presentation app that allows students to import pictures, text, or videos. They also create a picture cover, title, and subtitle. The app is very user-friendly and after (literally) 5 minutes of introducing the app to the kids, they were able to work together to create their presentations.

They worked in their teams to import the photos they had taken into a presentation. Then, they had to size and edit the pictures to look any way they wanted. They could pull them long, make them tiny, or make some look different than others.

They also had to pick a picture to be the presentation’s cover and create a title for their projects.

Using Storehouse

Using Storehouse

Using Storehouse

Using Storehouse

The kids all did a wonderful job working together, taking turns, and creating as a team!

Using Storehouse

Using Storehouse

Using Storehouse

Using Storehouse

The last step was presenting! The teams took turns showing their presentation to the class. One student held the iPad and scrolled through the photos while the other group members described the objects they’d found.

Presenting

Presenting

Presenting

Presenting

(I know the pictures aren’t great- the lights were off!)

Presenting

Presenting

Presenting

Presenting

The presentations also have a link that you can look at through the computer. Check out some of the awesome presentations that were ENTIRELY created by my first graders!

Rectangle

Circle Group

Triangle

I’m loving this app and can’t wait to find more uses for it! I hope you enjoyed this look into my class!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Happy St. Patrick’s Day!

Top ‘o the morning afternoon to ya!

Happy St. Patrick’s day and happy Monday to you all!

My kiddos are at gym right now and I wanted to pop in quickly to show you the AMAZING pictures of the leprechaun traps our students and families made last week.

(We try to send home one family project each quarter and for third quarter, this seemed perfect! We asked the students and families to use things at home or they bought to create a trap to catch a leprechaun!)

They also had to fill out some graphic organizers as part of their homework about the trap they created.

Planning Page

Planning Page

Sequence

Sequence

What it looks like

What it looks like

Writing

Writing

Last Friday, the students turned in their homework pages and traps. We set them up outside the hallway when we left and hoped we’d find some sneaky little leprechaun men and women this morning.

BUT…..

those guys were just too tricky for us!

However, they left behind some footprints we could see!

Traps

Traps

Traps

Traps

Traps

Traps

Traps

Traps

Traps

Traps

Traps

Traps

 

Their traps blew me away- I couldn’t believe how creative, imaginative, and awesome they were!

Traps

Traps

Traps

Traps

Traps

Traps

Traps

Traps

Traps

Traps

Traps

Traps

Even though we didn’t catch one, we still had a lot of fun trying!

A HUGE thank you goes out to all of the parents and families who participated in this project! I can tell just how much time and effort went into making these. Let me tell you- the kids LOVED sharing them with each other and it was just such a fun experience. Thank you, thank you, thank you!

A lot of the kids are saying they want to try to catch one at home tonight. Good luck- they are very sneaky πŸ™‚

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sound {Common Core Science}

Do you hear that?

That loud sound coming from the first grade classroom… what could it be? It must be coming from the instruments the first graders made during their sound unit! πŸ™‚

To back things up a bit, we have spent the last few weeks on our science unit of sound! Sound waves are one of our new Common Core science standards for first grade!

Specifically:

-Sound can make matter vibrate, and vibrating matter can make sound. (1-PS4-1)

Science Journals

So we started the unit with the vocabulary words we needed to understand. Using our Science Journals, we began using different thinking maps to help us understand and explore the words pitch, volume, and vibrateΒ (We spent about 2- 3 days on each of those words):

Journal

Journal

Circle Map

Circle Map

On a circle map, the students write the vocabulary word in the middle. Before you define the words, the kids write all of the things they THINK they know about the word around it. After we’ve learned the word, we go back and cross out any information that doesn’t fit and add anything else we need to that defines the word.

Bubble Map

Bubble Map

In a bubble map, the students write the word in the middle. Then, they use adjectives around the outside to define and tell more. Around the word pitch, you can see we wrote different types of pitches, as well as examples.

Pitch

Pitch

Pitch

Pitch

Pitch

Pitch

I also like to include writing pages. Here, the students can process and reflect the information they learned. On these writing pages, the students drew pictures of things that make different pitches. A lion makes a low pitch roar, a person screaming makes a high pitch sound, and a nice singing voice can be a medium pitch noise.

We spend a lot of time discussing these words, maps, and writing pages too! Not only does this reinforce the words and their meanings, but it is essential to develop language skills!

On this day, the students were sharing what they’d written about their favorite pitch.

 

Sharing

Sharing

Sharing

Sharing

Sharing

Sharing

A fun way to do this is the “1 minute share”. The kids spread out with their journal and quickly find a partner. They have 1 minute to share what they wrote with each other. After one minute, I yell “switch!” and the kids have to find a new partner to share with for one minute. This works out great because they are interacting with different people and it’s a quick reading, speaking, and listening practice!

Sharing

Sharing

Sharing

Sharing

Instruments

After spending about two weeks on the vocabulary words and exploring sound through videos, examples, and different texts, we were ready to put all of our knowledge to use!

It was time for us to build a musical instrument!

{Side note: In prepping this unit, the first grade teachers wanted to have a culminating activity that was both hands-on and was a way for the kids to show their knowledge on sound waves. One of the teachers suggested having the kids build instruments out of recyclable materials. In the process, they would have to find ways to make sound (by striking, shaking, or strumming something) and how something was making sound (by vibrating the material and then the air waves around it). The students would also have to be able to describe the pitch of their instrument and the volume it made.} That was a long side note πŸ™‚

 

Planning

Planning

First- the planning process. Students got to pick their own partners for this project and worked together to complete a planning page for this activity. They had to decide together what kind of instrument they would make (a drum instrument, a string instrument, or a shaker) and sketch what they’d like it to look like.

Planning

Planning

Planning

Planning

Planning page

Planning page

The next day began the building! The kiddos could select any objects they wanted from a selection of various recyclable materials (boxes, paper towel rolls, paper, tissue boxes, paper plates, etc). There were also other things, like rice, dried beans, rubber bands, and wooden sticks for them to incorporate. Using their planning page, they worked to make their instrument with their partner.

Building

Building

Building

Building

Building

Building

Building

Building

This was a two day process and each day, the partners added more details and worked on their instruments.

Building

Building

Building

Building

Building

Building

 

Diagram

After the building process, it was time to record many of the steps and things they’d done to build our instruments. First, the students drew a diagram of their instrument. We’ve been learning a lot about diagrams, so we tried to add as many details and labels as we would into ours!

Diagram

Diagram

Diagram

Diagram

Diagram

Diagram

Diagram

Diagram

Diagram

Diagram

Diagram

Diagram

Things Not Pictured

I tried really hard to get pictures of all of the steps of this project…. but some days I do better at that than others πŸ™‚

So, things we did (but I forgot to picture) was a materials page, where we spent the day analyzing our instruments and writing down all of the materials we use AND a procedure page, where we wrote the steps of how we built our instruments- with words like first, next, then, and last.

CoverΒ 

One of the last things we did was color in the cover of the project books. The kids had to draw a picture of what their instrument looked like.

Cover

Cover

Cover

Cover

Cover

Cover

Sharing

On the final day, we sat in a circle and presented our instruments to the class. Even though they’d all see each others throughout the process, now was the time for the students to share how they made their instrument, what pitch it made, and what volume it made. I also asked them how their instrument made sound. This culminating activity was also a formative assessment- could the students answer these sound questions using vocabulary words?

Sharing

Sharing

Sharing

Sharing

They demonstrated how to play their instrument and explained the process to make it. They also used vocabulary words to talk about the sound it made, the pitch it made, and how their instrument made sound.

This was AN AMAZING unit. I love every minute of it- and so did the kids! The instrument making activity was fun, engaging, and incorporated everything we’d learned.

Where do we go from here?

We are spending the next two weeks before spring break comparing and contrasting light waves and sound waves!

If you are an educator and interested in this unit, it’s for sale at my TpT store:

Sound

Sound

Or you can click this link: Sound Pack {Common Core Aligned}

If you’re interested in my Light and Sound bundle pack, you can click this link: Light and Sound Bundle Pack {Common Core Aligned}

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Close Reading Strategy- Main Idea and Details with Technology!

Good morning!

I hope your Tuesday is off to a great start. Around here our schedule is a little wacky- because of ISAT testing, all of our specials are now in the morning to accommodate the older kids! Which means, right now the little darlings are at music class and I could pop in to talk about another great close reading strategyfinding the main idea and details!

We actually did this one in February, but I never got around to posting it. Oops πŸ™‚

Our close reading passage was on giraffes and on the third day of the week, we focused on the main idea of the text and the details that tell us more.

The first thing we did was talk about all of this orally. Not only is oral language part of the Common Core standards, but it’s essential to develop language skills in my ELL learners.

After this, the students got into groups and used the Popplet app to summarize and visually show what the main idea was and the details that told more.

Popplet!

Popplet!

 

This is a FREE app that allows you to make a web, which you could use for many different reasons. Here’s an example of one I found on-line.

Example

Example

You can upload pictures, like in the example above, and add all of those boxes around it to tell more.

In my class, we used the app to write the main idea and add boxes around that which told more about the main idea. The important part for us was that the kids used details from the text to support the main idea.

We started by all writing in a box what the main idea of the passage was- giraffes!

Main Idea/Detail

Main Idea/Detail

(And let me remind you- the kids did this ALL by themselves! We have used this app several times whole class, so they were aware of the buttons and functions, but they did all of the writing, adding boxes, and finding details in their own groups! Amazing!)

After we all started off by writing down the main idea, the students worked in their groups to find supporting details from the passage. When they all found one they agreed on, they had to work together to add it to their web.

Main Idea/Detail

Main Idea/Detail

(I LOVE how engaged with the text they are! Doing something like this is so hands-on and fun that they don’t even realize how closely they are interacting with the passage- but I LOVE it!)

Main Idea/Detail

Main Idea/Detail

Below is a close up of something a group was working on…

Main Idea/Detail

Main Idea/Detail

The app is very easy to use. The kids got the hang of it right away. All you need to do is double tap somewhere on the screen to bring up a new box. By touching a circle on the box, you can draw a connecting line between boxes. Touch the “T” button and you’re ready to type!

Main Idea/Detail

Main Idea/Detail’

 

Main Idea/Detail

Main Idea/Detail

This was such a great way to incorporate technology into our lesson. The kids were able to interact deeply with the passage an additional time, find supporting details that told more about a text, and practice typing skills. On top of all of that, they practiced team skills like sharing, oral language, and finding things in a text together.

The end result was pretty amazing. We reflected (projected) each groups main idea/detail web onto the board so everyone could see what each group did. The kids in that group read the details they found which told more about the main idea. The kids got a kick out of seeing if the other groups had similar things to what they had. I got a kick out of seeing how well they were able to use this technology together!

This is a wonderful app that can be used in many other ways. I use it a lot in my small flexible reading groups when we are working on things like compare/contrast, describing something, or reinforcing main idea and details. Try it out and see how you can use it at home or in school!

Happy Tuesday- I’m off to pick up the munchkins! πŸ™‚