B is for Biography

 

Biography

Biography

Do you know who invented the traffic signal? You don’t? Well my first graders do- Garrett Morgan! We read all about Mr. Morgan and how he solved the traffic problem where he lived. He was a problem solver- he saw people getting into accidents and knew something had to be done. His invention helped cars, horses/buggies, and people cross the street and get places safely.

The above book is from Reading A-Z (Reading A-Z Website) and was filled with lots of great information. For example, not only did Garrett Morgan invent the stop light, but he also invented the mask that firefighters wear to help them breathe. What an important person!

After reading his biography, we used a simple biography organizer to summarize our learning. I found this great one on TpT from the store of “The Third Wheel”. You can find it by going TO THIS LINK! And… it’s free! You can’t really get better than that! 🙂

Biography Organizer

Biography Organizer

Biography Organizer

Biography Organizer

I love flip organizers because I think it helps the kids visually split up their thinking. I also love that this organizer has question words on the front- which was our last reading unit!

Biography Organizer

Biography Organizer

Biography Organizer

Biography Organizer

We filled out the inside together and then the kids got to draw pictures to match.

Biography Organizer

Biography Organizer

Biography Organizer

Biography Organizer

Biography Organizer

Biography Organizer

Biography Organizer

Biography Organizer

I love their pictures and ideas! This was a great way to summarize our knowledge on Garrett Morgan. Tomorrow, we’ll read the biography of Sarah E. Goode, another inventor. On Friday, we’ll be using our Double Bubble thinking map to compare and contrast the two person (just like explained HERE!!!!!)

Have a wonderful day and thanks for checking in to our adventure!

 

Double Bubbles: Compare/Contrast

 

Before our regular scheduled programming, here are a few quick shots of the kiddlets working with their learning partners. I assign kids with partners that last for an entire quarter of school. I’ve found that for keeping consistent partners, the kids learn how to work well together, how to help each other, and build solid team work skills. Here they are working on a math activity.

Learning Partners

Learning Partners

Learning Partners

Learning Partners

Learning Partners

Learning Partners

Learning Partners

Learning Partners

Learning Partners

Learning Partners

Back to the topic of this post- thinking maps! Our school is a thinking maps school. To learn more about thinking maps, check out their website here: THINKING MAPS!

One of my kids favorite thinking maps is the Double Bubble map. It’s a way for students to compare and contrast. This month, comparing and contrasting is our current reading strategy.

The reading genre we are currently working on is biographies. So, each week we read two different biographies and then compare/contrast them using the Double Bubble thinking map.

Biography

Biography

Biography

Biography

The two biographies we read this week was Ruby Bridges and Helen Keller. The kids got to listen to these stories, read other versions of the biographies, and watch video clips of these two women. Then on Friday, we began to think of ways that Ruby and Helen are the same, and ways that they are different.

Double Bubble

Double Bubble

Double Bubble

Double Bubble

You begin by writing the two names and circling them. Then, we thought of ways that the two women are similar. We did this as a team and wrote the same comparisons. The kids came up with these ideas, figuring out that they both were brave, strong, tried hard, and helped people.

You’ll notice that the bubbles in the middle connect to both women’s names. This helps the kids see that these traits are the same about both people.

Then, we thought of ways Helen Keller and Ruby Bridges were different. These bubbles connect to only the person that they pertain to. (Ideally, these outside bubbles should be point/counter-point. Meaning, if on one side we wrote “born in 1955”, on the other side we should have written “born in 1880”. This didn’t happen for this assignment, but that’s always the goal for this map!) 🙂

Using this thinking map is an excellent way for the kids to connect to the material and visually see the similarities and differences between two things. In this case, the kids got to see how the two biographies we read are the same and how they are different.

Double Bubble

Double Bubble

Double Bubble

Double Bubble

It’s been a great unit so far. Last week we read the biographies of Neil Armstrong and Amelia Earhart. The kids loved learning about both of these extraordinary people. Plus, since we’re also learning about the moon in science, it’s been a great connection. The kids are so excited when they see pictures of astronauts and immediately think they are all Neil Armstrong 🙂

Thanks for checking in on our adventure! Be sure to check back soon!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Constellation Kids!

Remember this post from a few days ago…

iPads= iConstellations

If you don’t, check it out! We wrapped up learning about constellations last week and as a culminating project, the kids used all their knowledge about stars to make a constellation of… themselves! It started earlier in the week when I took pictures of all the kiddlets, posing as their constellation.

This was a lot of fun and caused lots of giggles. I told the kids to lay on the carpet and I stood on a chair above them to get the shot. I told them to pose like a constellation. Some students had a very clear idea of what they wanted to look like, while others chose to look like a constellation we’ve already learned about. All of them turned out awesome! (Side note- I loved the kid who told me they were posing like a move we do in yoga! Yes!)

So, afterwards at home I printed off the photos (much to my sweet husband’s dismay- “You’re going to print all of those off in color?” Yes sweetie, I am) 🙂

And the next day, the kids opened up their trusty iPads and used the Doceri app to draw the constellation. But this time, they were imagining how the constellation of themselves would look.

Constellation Kids

Constellation Kids

Constellation Kids

Constellation Kids

Constellation Kids

Constellation Kids

Constellation Kids

Constellation Kids

I can’t tell you how much fun this was or how much the kids loved it! It was also a great lesson in how to think abstractly. They knew they weren’t suppose to just draw a picture of themselves. We wanted these to be constellations, imaginary pictures in the stars. This is a pretty “outside the box” visualization, but the kids did so well!

Constellation Kids

Constellation Kids

Constellation Kids

Constellation Kids

Constellation Kids

Constellation Kids

Constellation Kids

Constellation Kids

Notice the constellation has a mohawk. I love their imaginations!

Constellation Kids

Constellation Kids

Constellation Kids

Constellation Kids

After we got to practice drawing on the iPads, the kids used that to help them transfer the picture of a piece of black construction paper. I think that since they had the chance to practice drawing it many times on the iPad, this made the drawing process very simple and smooth.

Constellation Kids

Constellation Kids

Constellation Kids

Constellation Kids

Constellation Kids

Constellation Kids

Constellation Kids

Constellation Kids

Constellation Kids

Constellation Kids

Agh, these really couldn’t be any cuter! I was really impressed with how well the students did at making these! We finished this off by students writing about their project. I put sentence starters on the board that said, “I made…” and “It looks like…”. The kids did really well at finishing these with great thoughts. A good one was, “I made myself look like a girl because I am a girl”. Nothing like a true statement from a six year old 🙂

Anyways, this was a wonderful end of our constellation unit. It combined everything they’ve learned and put it together in a fun, digital, and innovative way.

Thanks for checking in on our adventure. As always, check back in with us to see what new things we are doing!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Parent Update- Organ Wise

Hi parents and families,

This post is a classroom update for you! This week, we were lucky enough to start a program through the University of Illinois extension program called Organ Wise. Once a week, a teacher will be coming into our room for 45 minutes to focus on health and wellness, with a connection to our Common Core standards.

This week was our first visit and the kids were introduced to the different organs in the body through a cute story and Andy, this fun puppet.

Andy!

Andy!

Andy helps the kids find the organs in the body, what their functions are, and how to take care of them. After the story, the kids got to do some fun movement activities and ended the lesson with coloring in a page from their workbooks.

Organ Wise

Organ Wise

Organ Wise

Organ Wise

Organ Wise

Organ Wise

Organ Wise

Organ Wise

Organ Wise

Organ Wise

Organ Wise

Organ Wise

It was a great introduction to this program. The kids had a lot of fun and we are all looking forward to next week!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Teens Are Groups of Ten and Ones!

1.NBT.2.B: The numbers from 11 to 19 are composed of a ten and one, two, three, four, five, six, seven, eight, or nine ones.

The above math standard has been the main focus on our math lessons for the past few days. On the surface, it seems pretty simple. Teen numbers right? Easy-peasy.

…Or is it?

Dun, dun, dun! 🙂

Well it’s not as scary as I’m making it seem, but it can be a complex idea when you need to kiddlets to understand that all of these numbers have a bundle (group of 10) in them and then additional “ones”. And even more complex when you need them to understand that this is why we write the numbers the way we do. For example, we write the number twelve the way we do because it has 1 group of ten and 2 ones ( 1 and 2 put together make the 12!)

Poster

Poster

I started by making this anchor chart. I like it because it shows that each of the teen numbers has a group of ten in it, and I also like how it shows the ones “growing”. After we discussed this, the kids used their iPads to make the same teen numbers.

We did this a bunch. I’d call out a teen number and the kids would make it. After a while, we made all the teen numbers, just like the poster.

Number Pieces app

Number Pieces app

Number Pieces app

Number Pieces app

 

Number Pieces app

Number Pieces app

The cool thing about the kids being able to manipulate these pieces on the app, is that it allows them to really see the pattern in teen numbers. As the kids were building, so many of them kept saying, “Hey it looks like a pattern!” or my favorite, “It looks like stairs!” 🙂

This has been a big focus on this standard, so yes, I love that they were really seeing that the teen numbers all have the one ten group and then the ones were “growing”, adding one more to each numeral.

Number Pieces app

Number Pieces app

Number Pieces app

Number Pieces app

Number Pieces app

Number Pieces app

Number Pieces app

Number Pieces app

 

Number Pieces app

Number Pieces app

Number chains…. I saw this on Pinterest (source) and knew I had to have my kiddos make them!

Number Chains

Number Chains

Again, I love that they reinforce the group of ten that all the teens have, and then the ones attached. My kids worked in their assigned learning partners, each group making the group of ten first.

Making Number Chains

Making Number Chains

Making Number Chains

Making Number Chains

Making Number Chains

Making Number Chains

As they finished their bundle of ten, then I assigned the duo their teen number. If they got 16, they had to pick one new color and add 6 ones. If they got 14, they had to pick one new color and add 4 ones.

Making Number Chains

Making Number Chains

Making Number Chains

Making Number Chains

Making Number Chains

Making Number Chains

Making Number Chains

Making Number Chains

It was a really fun activity and once they were hung up, it was another wonderful visual for the kids.

Thanks for checking in on our adventure! Be sure to check back to stay up to date on all the fun things we’re doing in first grade!