SAMR Model: iPads to Modify Writing

 

Puppy

Puppy

Good morning, good morning! The puppy (old dog) wanted to drop by and say hello to you too! He’s busy having some doggie play time and we’ve been busy in our first grade classroom too 🙂

You know we are 1:1 this year with iPads. When the year started, I was really using the iPads as a substitution for paper. This isn’t necessarily a bad thing- and it’s definitely a place to start!

But as the year has gone on, I’ve tried hard to find ways to use the iPad to modify and redefine our learning in ways that wouldn’t have been possible before.

(***This words- Substitute, Augment, Modify, Redefine– are based on the technology continuum called the SAMR MODEL***)

 

SAMR

SAMR

This picture is from the source linked above. If you click the link and log into Thinglink, you can touch each one of those apps and learn more about it. It should also be noted that most of those apps can really fit into different categories, depending on how you are using it.

The goal of this model is to help educators- and ultimately students- use technology in ways that allow them to create and share things that wouldn’t have been possible before.

iPads to Redefine Writing Time

We follow the “Be A Writer” writing program in our school. It’s a weekly writing program based on a anchor text each week. The story we read relates to the writing idea of the week.

I love it and love the books we read through the program.

This week, we read the story “Down The Road”.

Be A Writer

Be A Writer

It’s the story of a young girl named Hetty, who wants to walk down the road all by herself to get eggs for breakfast. It’s a theme my firsties can really relate too- this is the age where they want to do EVERYTHING by themselves AND want to be a “big kid”.

So, our writing theme this week was writing about themselves and something they can do by themselves. Also, we’ve been working on writing stories with a beginning, middle, and end. That meant, this week the kids were suppose to think of something they can do by themselves and write a story about that with a B, M, and E.

Typically, we spend Monday brainstorming ideas. The kids work with their learning partners and orally tell their stories. Then the next day, the kids begin writing. I like this format….

…..but the trouble always is, some of the kids forget what they want to write about or lose the focus from the day before.

The other problem of most first graders in writing is, it’s very hard to get their ideas from their brains down onto the paper. And for my ELL class, it’s hard for them to write complete sentences, without leaving out words that help make the story make sense. (For example, they might write shorter sentences like “Play sister” instead of “I play with my sister”).

Using iPads in writing

Using iPads in writing

Enter the iPads. After we had brainstormed ideas and talked with partners on Monday, the kids got their iPads and recorded videos of themselves saying their idea.

We shared these videos and talked about how some students added details in their videos. For example, some students simply said in their video “I can ride my bike”, but some kids said “I can ride my bike. I ride my bike fast and I ride my bike slow”. After seeing these great examples, some kids went back and changed their videos to add more.

Using iPads in writing

Using iPads in writing

The next day, there was no kid who forgot their idea because they could instantly watch their video and remember!

After shared writing (doing an example like a team together), the kids were ready to write their own story!

We started by having students find a spot in the room. They brought with their iPads and writing papers.

Using iPads in writing

Using iPads in writing

They were told to watch their videos as much as they needed. Around the room you’d hear lots of videos playing, but the kids were totally focused and working.

Using iPads in writing

Using iPads in writing

Each time they watched their video, they better remembered and thought about their idea. And for my English language learners, the more they listened, the more they remembered all those little words to make their sentence make sense!

Using iPads in writing

Using iPads in writing

Using iPads in writing

Using iPads in writing

We started with drawing the pictures first this time, three pictures for beginning, middle, and end describing the special thing they can do by themselves.

Using iPads in writing

Using iPads in writing

After their pictures were drawn, they were able to write sentences about each part.

Using iPads in writing

Using iPads in writing

Using iPads in writing

Using iPads in writing

Using iPads in writing

Using iPads in writing

Using iPads in writing

Using iPads in writing

I am telling you, I had students writing and working in a way I haven’t seen them do before. Writing time is always quiet, but has never been this focused. I had students who seriously struggle with writing and putting down their ideas that were now EXCELLING! It was such a motivation for all the students, and a wonderful support for my kids who struggle with putting their ideas into words. By being able to watch their video again and again, they never lost sight of the main idea.

Using iPads in writing

Using iPads in writing

Using iPads in writing

Using iPads in writing

Also, they were able to hear all the words they needed to write. And, at times, they were able to hear themselves making oral speaking mistakes. I had one student who said, “Oh, I didn’t say that right”. They were able to hear their mistakes and fix it in their writing.

This was such an amazing beginning to our writing this week! Be sure to check back as I update this post to include additional steps to enhance this project- APP SMASHING!

Thanks for checking in on our adventure. Be sure to check back soon!

 

 

Fables

 

Fables

Fables

 

Our new literacy unit started a few weeks ago and our genre is FABLES! Each day before we begin our read aloud and shared reading time, we review the characteristics of fables. The kids are getting really good at understanding what makes a fable special.

Vocab

Vocab

Then, we always go over the rich vocabulary words from the fable of the day. There are so many amazing words in these stories! Not only do these words build our vocabulary, but they also are important for us to understand so we understand the story.

Can you tell that the words above are from the fable The Fox and the Grapes?

After this review, we get into our fable.

Fable

Fable

We’ve been using our iPads a lot to send out the fable through the Handouts app. It’s great because the students can annotate directly on the iPad. You can see in the picture above that we highlighted all the special vocabulary words on their iPads before we read.

After we read the fable a few times, we used an organizer to summarize the story.

Fables

Fables

Fables

Fables

I love how the kids can go back and forth between the iPads and the paper. They are getting so good at look for “text evidence” from the passages we read to find answers. The iPads are a engaging way for the kids to look back at the text to find supporting evidence.

Extension

Extension

On this day, we also completed a worksheet about what the fox in the fable should have done instead of giving up. The kids ideas were so wonderful and showed how creative they can think! Check out their ideas of what the fox in the story should have done to keep going and get the grapes!

Extension

Extension

The fox could have tried…..

Extension

Extension

….to shake the tree…..

Extension

Extension

…..to put books under the tree to make a ladder….

Extension

Extension

…..tried jumping higher….

Extension

Extension

…..or shaken the tree (again) 🙂

This unit is off to a great start!

Each week we read 2 fables, summarize the fables, and then compare/contrast the two. The kids are learning reading skills, comparing skills, and reviewing our summarizing skills. It’s been wonderful so far!

Thanks for checking in on our adventure. Be sure to check back soon!

Genius Hour {The Who’s, What’s, When’s, Where’s, and Why’s}

It’s that time of year. Can you smell it in the air? It’s the spring testing season!

During this crazy special time of the year, the kids are busy, busy, busy bees taking tons of assessments. This means a lot of things, one of which being that we don’t have computer/library time. It can be hard to fill this time slot in our schedule. It’s also hard for the kids to not have a break in their day. I’ve tried lots of different ways to both give the kids that slight break they need, but still keep them engaged and behaving.

It’s tough!

A few weeks ago I went to the ICE Conference (a technology conference in the region) and spent one session on “Genius Hour”. I’d heard about it before from other teachers in my school and district implementing this idea, but hadn’t really tried it myself. When I saw this teacher showing the projects her students had created, I knew I had to give it a try!

So what is Genius Hour?

The website  GENIUS HOUR.COM defines Genius Hour as:

“… a movement in schools that allows students to explore their own passions and encourages creativity in the classroom. It provides students a choice in what they learn during a set period of time during school.”

Genius Hour with Haiku Deck

Genius Hour with Haiku Deck

Basically, it’s a time for students to ask a question, explore an answer, and create a presentation/project to show what they’ve discovered. Ideally, they should share these projects with each other. The idea they explore should be one that is interesting to that particular student.

Genius Hour with Haiku Deck

Genius Hour with Haiku Deck

Genius Hour can look very different in different places and different grade levels.

In my classroom, since we are 1:1 and all my kids have iPads, we did this project entirely on our devices. But, this doesn’t have to be the case. Students could make posters, pictures, diagrams, visual aides, anything to show their answers. Also, students should be able to pick the way they want to present their information…. in our case, eventually this is the goal. To begin, we’ve all been using the same app to show our work. Goals people! 🙂

Setting Expectations

Setting Expectations

We began our FIRST Genius Hour by talking about what the word “genius” even means. I said that during this time, we would be creating something that was interesting to us.

I told them that they would be given a question and have to create a presentation to show others the answers. (We also had to go over what a presentation is. Sometimes we think kids know all these words, but you really need to break it down).

In my first grade room, I started by giving my students a Genius question to investigate. The questions have been some-what simple and relate to their favorite things. For my little ones just starting out, our first Genius Question was:

Question

Question

This is a question that kids love to talk about and have lots of answers for! While it doesn’t take researching, it does give them an opportunity to create something that is important and interesting to them that they can share with others.

Then, I introduced the app Haiku Deck

Haiku Deck

Haiku Deck

It’s an easy to navigate/use app that is similar to a PowerPoint presentation. The kids create slides by pressing the white plus sign down in the right corner.

Genius Hour with Haiku Deck

Genius Hour with Haiku Deck

When they add a slide, they can choose how they want to layout (the text) to look.

Layout

Layout

Then, they can search pictures WITHIN THE APP. This is probably my favorite aspect of this app.

Pictures

Pictures

I’ve noticed that the pictures are generally very kid-friendly- of course if they are searching kid-friendly words. 🙂

The kids click on the picture they want and it appears to the right as a preview. The kids can resize the image by using two fingers. They click save and it appears on their slide.

Along the bottom of the screen is their total presentation. They can scroll through all the slides, move the order of the slides, or delete a slide if they need to.

Here is a student’s final presentation that gives you a good idea of what it looks like when they are finished and scroll through all their slides:

Genius Hour with Haiku Deck

Genius Hour with Haiku Deck

Genius Hour with Haiku Deck

Genius Hour with Haiku Deck

Genius Hour with Haiku Deck

Genius Hour with Haiku Deck

Genius Hour with Haiku Deck

Genius Hour with Haiku Deck

Genius Hour with Haiku Deck

Genius Hour with Haiku Deck

How cool is that? This was made by a student ALL ON THEIR OWN. They had to create a slide, write the word, search a picture, pick the layout, and put it all together.

So why is this important? Why should you do this in your room?

1. It differentiates instantly based on level and interest. You students are working on their own projects, instantly at their own level. They are based on their interest, which engages them and helps them want to focus.

2. It allows them to practice creating a presentation. Making presentations to show their learning is something they will HAVE to be able to do as adults. This also helps them get excited about doing things like this in the future!

3. It practices speaking and listening skills. When the kids present, they are working on expressing themselves to others and listening as people present.

4. They are still learning about your curriculum. While I began Genius Hour with a question about their favorite food, you can make them pick a question based on your unit. If you’re learning about stars, have them come up with a Genius Question about stars they want to know more about. There is no loss of instructional time. Only engaged, active thinking, research time!

5. They are focusing on technology skills. Researching, importing pictures, typing on a device. These are all skills that students need. Doing Genius Hour with iPads, computers, etc allow students to practice all of these skills.

 

Genius Hour with Haiku Deck

Genius Hour with Haiku Deck

Genius Hour with Haiku Deck

Genius Hour with Haiku Deck

Genius Hour with Haiku Deck

Genius Hour with Haiku Deck

Genius Hour with Haiku Deck

Genius Hour with Haiku Deck

Genius Hour with Haiku Deck

Genius Hour with Haiku Deck

Genius Hour with Haiku Deck

Genius Hour with Haiku Deck

Genius Hour with Haiku Deck

Genius Hour with Haiku Deck

Genius Hour with Haiku Deck

Genius Hour with Haiku Deck

Genius Hour with Haiku Deck

Genius Hour with Haiku Deck

 

 

Whew, it’s a lot of information. But here are some tips when trying this with your kids:

Before you begin, set clear expectations! This is no different than any other time of the day and the kids need to know that if they are misusing materials, they will lose them. This is a time they are having fun, but they still need to be held accountable for their work. How can they be held accountable? In my first grade room, I stopped them about every 10 minutes and had them hold up their iPads as a “quick check”. I needed to see progress being made. If they were holding up an iPad that showed no work, I knew the students who needed more focus.

Pick a spot for you to sit and let the students know your role during this time. I told my students that during Genius Hour, I would be sitting at our back table (which is called the technology table).

My spot

My spot

I told them I was there to help them as they were searching for pictures and putting together their presentation. I was there for technical help.  I was NOT there to do things like help them spell words. Your role during Genius Hour is a facilitator, you are there to monitor. You are there to help them clarify their thinking or help lead them to different ideas. You are not there to give them their idea, to tell them what to do, or to find things for them.

Genius Hour with Haiku Deck

Genius Hour with Haiku Deck

If a student had a question, they would bring their iPad over to me and we’d solve it together.

Give students a choice of where they work. I allowed my students to pick their own spots around the room. You can see that even though they are all spread out, they are all on-task.

Genius Hour with Haiku Deck

Genius Hour with Haiku Deck

Genius Hour with Haiku Deck

Genius Hour with Haiku Deck

Let students know the consequences for off-task behavior. Again, this is no different than any other part of your day. But since this is a much more student-centered time, the kids need to know that they are still required to work and follow rules. Before my kids started, I went over our MAPS (what Materials they needed, their Attitudes, where their sitting Placement would be, and what their Speaking voice should be)

In all, Genius Hour is an amazing time for you and your students. We’ve done it twice now. My kids love it and it’s a way to fill that computer time when we don’t have a special. I love it and so do the kiddlets. They ask me when we are doing “smart time” again 🙂

Check it out in your own room and see how it goes. Are you able to let your kids pick their own questions?

Thanks for checking in on our adventure- be sure to come back soon!

 

 

 

App Smashing 2.0: The Moon

 

Me!

Me!

A couple of things…. first, how cute is that picture? One of my kiddlets drew this for me during indoor recess and it made me smile! I love it and this is obviously how I stand all the time in class 🙂

Another thing…

Ariel!

Ariel!

It’s been a long weekend for the hubs and I. We spent the day in the car yesterday making the 8+ hour drive to pick up our new fur-baby. Her name is Ariel and she is a two year old terrier/hound mix. She’s a rescue dog and was brought in after a neglect call. They believe she spent her whole two years chained outside. We love her already and are so happy to welcome her to our family!

App Smashing

Back in the classroom, we spent Friday on another app smashing activity. Not sure what app smashing is? Check out THIS POST I MADE ABOUT APP-SMASHING to learn more about it.

Basically, app smashing is creating something in one app and then enhancing that product in a second (or more) app. 

Just like before, we used Doceri and ChatterPix.

We’ve been learning all about the moon. The kids know so many interesting facts and are continually coming up with wonderful things to say about the moon. I was pretty impressed when during a discussion one of my little ones said, “The moon is Earth’s closest neighbor”. Isn’t that the cutest- and true-est- thing? (yes, true-est is totally a word) 😉

Anyways, as a way for them to “show what you know” (which is what we call our formative, ongoing assessments), the students were told to make a ChatterPix video telling everything they know about the moon.

First up, they needed to draw an accurate picture in Doceri.

Doceri Moon Drawing

Doceri Moon Drawing

Doceri Moon Drawing

Doceri Moon Drawing

Doceri Moon Drawing

Doceri Moon Drawing

Doceri Moon Drawing

Doceri Moon Drawing

Doceri Moon Drawing

Doceri Moon Drawing

Look at how wonderfully detailed these pictures are! The kids did such a good job incorporating things we’ve learned about the moon into their pictures. Before we drew, one little thinker asked if he could draw the moon in different phases. I told them that would be a WONDERFUL idea, however, I didn’t want to see the moon as just a little piece. If they simply drew a crescent shape, for example, that tells me that they think the moon is actually changing shapes. I told them to draw the full round moon, but shade in a certain area to show the shadow of the Earth making the phase. Does this sound too hard for my little scientist? Nope! They nailed it!

Moon Phase

Moon Phase

Moon Phase

Moon Phase

Moon Phase

Moon Phase

I also loved this picture, where the student explained to me that he wanted to show that the light from the Sun reflects off the moon, and that’s why we see the moon lit up in the sky.

Moon Reflecting Light

Moon Reflecting Light

I love that all their pictures are showing their knowledge, but are all different. The iPad is such a wonderful tool to allow creativity! I’m always impressed by how well they use this app too. Look at how well, and easily, they manipulate the color wheels and pick their own shades on the color spectrum.

Picking Colors

Picking Colors

Picking Colors

Picking Colors

Here are just a few more pictures, I can’t help myself. They are all so good!

Moon Doceri Drawings

Moon Doceri Drawings

Wondering what the colors are? The student remembered (and explained to me) that stars can be different colors, including red, yellow, orange, and blue. He’s right! 🙂

Moon Doceri Drawings

Moon Doceri Drawings

Moon Doceri Drawings

Moon Doceri Drawings

Moon Doceri Drawings

Moon Doceri Drawings

Enter the app smashing part. When we talk about app smashing with my kids, I have them hold up two fists. One fist we talk about being the first app, the second fist we talk about being the second app. Then, we make our fists “smash” together, which they love- and add sound effects for 🙂

We talk about how when we smash apps, we are putting two things together.

So the first thing we had to do we take a screen shot of our Doceri picture, so that it would be saved to the iPads camera roll.

Taking A Screen Shot

Taking A Screen Shot

Easy-peasy.

Then, the students opened up the ChatterPix app. They open their camera roll and import the picture they just took from their Doceri app. Then, they draw a mouth line for their moon. Last, the students were told to record all the facts they could think of about the moon.

We spread out around the room. It helps with the noise control with 26 little voices are recording at once 🙂

Recording In ChatterPix

Recording In ChatterPix

Recording In ChatterPix

Recording In ChatterPix

Recording In ChatterPix

Recording In ChatterPix

Recording in ChatterPix

Recording in ChatterPix

After recording, ChatterPix has a lot of add-on options, like color effects (think Instagram), stickers, or the option to type on top of the picture. I’ve found that at times, adding stickers can get kinda of silly. So, I told the kids they could only use the typing feature to add words if they wanted.

Typing

Typing

Typing

Typing

Typing

Typing

Finally, they save their project and export it to their camera roll.

Exporting to Camera Roll

Exporting to Camera Roll

The last thing we did was share our videos with each other. We are still working on having the students use AirPlay to reflect their own iPads into the board, so for now, we simply put their iPads under the Doc Cam to share.

Sharing

Sharing

Sharing

Sharing

Sharing

Sharing

It was another excellent adventure in app smashing! And- it was a quick formative check for me! What do the kids understand and remember about the moon? Are they able to express their knowledge? Are they able to speak in full sentences? How is their speaking and listening skills? It’s a way to quickly check for a variety of skills!

By the way, this whole activity was done in about 30 minutes. I know that sounds fast, but the kids get so fast at it! It doesn’t need to take a lot of time to do something fun like this.

And if you’re thinking, “Well this is great, but I only have 5 iPads in room. I can’t do something like this”. I’m here to tell you- this type of thing can TOTALLY be done in small groups too. Last year, I only had 5 iPads in my room and I did this same activity with groups. Only have 1 iPad in your room? Make this a center! You can still watch their videos and see their understanding as they get a chance to make their video.

Thanks for checking in on our adventure! Be sure to check back anytime or comment on how you are using iPads in your classroom. Any other app smashing ideas? I’ve love to hear them!

100 Days of School!

 

100th Day!!!

100th Day!!!

Yesterday we celebrated the 100th day of school! The kids came in so excited and we spent the day doing all things “100”!

100th Day Crowns

100th Day Crowns

First up was making 100th Day crowns! The kids colored in their crowns that said “______ is 100 days smarter!” and we attached them to paper bands.

100th Day Crowns

100th Day Crowns

100th Day Crowns

100th Day Crowns

100th Day Crowns

100th Day Crowns

After lunch (we only had a half day of school), the kids put on their capes! Earlier in the month, we sent home cut pieces of tablecloth and told the students to make a 100th day cape! (many students made their own capes which was awesome too!) We got the idea from Pinterest (of course!) and did it last year. It was a BIG hit so we knew we had to repeat it this year. The kids can decorate their capes however they’d like! Many kids put 100 things on their capes.

Capes!

Capes!

Capes!

Capes!

Capes!

Capes!

Capes!

Capes!

Capes!

Capes!

Capes!

Capes!

Capes!

Capes!

Capes!

Capes!

Capes!

Capes!

Capes!

Capes!

100 fingers!

100 fingers!

Pink cape!

Pink cape!

I love how different they all are and how they reflect that student’s personality! I love seeing all their capes, and love how much fun the kids have in them 🙂

What did I wear? Not a cape. This year, one of my first grade co-workers came across the idea to make shirts with tally marks made of ribbon. The tally marks count to 100. So….

Shirt!

Shirt!

That’s what we made! How cute did they turn out? The kids loved it and right away were counting the tally marks. They were so excited to see the teacher’s celebrating too!

Up close

Up close

They were simple to make. We bought a bunch of ribbon from Wal-Mart and then just cut out pieces. Then, we hot glued them to t-shirts. They turned out so cute!

 

Next up, another fun 100th day activity! The kids cut out the numbers “1” “0” “0”…

Cutting

Cutting

Cutting

Cutting

Cutting

Cutting

…and then had to use those numbers to create a picture. They had to use their imagination and turn them into something else. Their ideas were awesome- as usual 🙂

A dog

A dog

A butterfly

A butterfly

A lion

A lion

A house

A house

An angry bird!

An angry bird!

A snowman

A snowman

A car

A car

These were just a few of the amazing ideas I saw! The kids really liked this activity and were giggling as they saw how everyone turned their numbers into something different.

Next up, a little moving! We love getting our wiggles out, so what a better way to do that than moving along while counting to 100! We did several songs where the kids had to do different exercises while counting, the Macarena while counting, and other sing-along songs!

Moving and Counting

Moving and Counting

Moving and Counting

Moving and Counting

Moving and Counting

Moving and Counting

Moving and Counting

Moving and Counting

We also read the story “It’s the 100th Day Stinky Face!” (we read a different Stinky Face story on Valentine’s day and the kids loved it)

In the story, he can’t think of what to bring for the 100th day of school. He ends up (spoiler alert!) bringing 100 questions.

After, I told the kids that we probably ask 100 questions in school everyday too! But we also probably can write 100 words as well. So I gave my little genius’ a question: Can you write 100 words? Yeah!

Book

Book

Writing 100 words

Writing 100 words

Writing 100 words

Writing 100 words

They were off! The kids were really focused. While they were writing, I could hear them say things like “Wow, I have half done!” “Oh man, I can’t wait to write 100 words!”. It was really cute 🙂

Writing 100 words

Writing 100 words

Writing 100 words

Writing 100 words

Writing 100 words

Writing 100 words

Writing 100 words

Writing 100 words

Writing 100 words

Writing 100 words

Writing 100 words

Writing 100 words

So, that about sums up our 100th day! It was filled with lots of fun things. The kids are definitely 100 days smarter, bigger, more creative, and turning into the most wonderful first graders! Here’s to the next 100 days!

Thanks for checking in on our adventure! Be sure to come back soon!

O-R-E-O…. Yummy Moon Phases

 

Oreo Moon Phases

Oreo Moon Phases

Let’s set the scene.

It was a Friday afternoon.

We’re talking 3:00 on a FRIDAY afternoon.

3:00 on a Friday afternoon after a solid 2 weeks of indoor recess.

3:00 on a Friday afternoon after a solid 2 weeks of indoor recess and the day after the kids just had a sub.

One can imagine the squirminess of my little ones 😉

So how does one reel in a group of six and seven year olds, whose minds are on everything but the science we are suppose to be learning? Well, on this day…. it was with Oreos! Have you ever seen the focus on a group of kids when you mention this word? Try it anytime to see 100%, undivided attention 🙂

We were learning about the different phases of the moon. On the backside of the worksheet (I forgot to take a picture of it) we looked at all the phases of the moon. We talked about it’s pattern, how it appears to be “growing” and “shrinking”.

Then, we flipped it over and looked at four of these phases specifically. It started like this…

Me: “Do you know what these moon pictures look like to me?”

Students: “What?”

Me: “Oreo cookies”

Students: “Oooooh yeah!”

Me: “You know what? I wish I had some cookies here and could use them to make the moon phases”

Students: “OOOOOOOOOHHHHHH ME TOOOOOOOOO!”

Me: **Pulls out a bag with Oreo boxes*** “Well, it’s a good thing I have some right here”

Students: “AHSKHJDFLKSUHFLASKUHFLAKSDHFALSDKJH!” (This is first grade language which means, “We are so excited”, but it sounds much more like the letters above)

Basically, that’s how it went 🙂

Oreo Moon Phases

Oreo Moon Phases

The kids jobs were to take their Oreos and make them look like one of the four Moon phases we were looking at. They were extra careful!

Oreo Moon Phases

Oreo Moon Phases

Oreo Moon Phases

Oreo Moon Phases

Oreo Moon Phases

Oreo Moon Phases

Oreo Moon Phases

Oreo Moon Phases

Then, we described each one of these phases below the cookie. We did this together- under the strict directions that no cookies were to be harmed (eaten) during this process 😉

Oreo Moon Phases

Oreo Moon Phases

Oreo Moon Phases

Oreo Moon Phases

We described each phase. We wrote things like “bright”, “full” and “round” for the first phase.

Oreo Moon Phases

Oreo Moon Phases

Oreo Moon Phases

Oreo Moon Phases

For other phases, we talked about what part of the Moon was lit and what part was dark. The kids were especially focused during this writing process. Hmmm, I wonder what was keeping their focus 😉

Ok, so after we finished these Tree Maps, the kids got to…. clean up. Just kidding! You know they got their little treat.

Oreo Moon Phases

Oreo Moon Phases

Oreo Moon Phases

Oreo Moon Phases

Oreo Moon Phases

Oreo Moon Phases

Oreo Moon Phases

Oreo Moon Phases

While eating, we watched Sid the Science Kid and the episode about the moon. We got through about half of it before we had to pack up for the day. This was really a fun day for us! It’s not often we do things like this with food and the kids had a blast! Also, as much fun as it was, it also helped them see the different ways the Moon looks.

Thanks for checking in on our adventure! Be sure to check back soon!