M is for Measure

 

Sunny Days

Sunny Days

Happy Saturday! We’ve made it through another week {we’re almost at 40 days of school…. can you believe that? I feel like school just started!}

Right now, we’re in the middle of our measurement unit {1.MD.1 & 1.MD.2}, which focuses on measuring with non-standard units, basically we are measuring objects with things other than rulers. This leads us into the second standard, which is about comparing things based on their lengths. We are putting objects in order from longest to shortest OR from shortest to longest.

Here is a couple ways we are doing this in class!

Comparing Sizes

Comparing Sizes

Comparing Sizes

Comparing Sizes

Last year I bought this pack from TpT on measurement, which is based on the fairy tale Jack and the Beanstalk. We started off by reading the story together and discussing some of the things in the story that were long and some things that were short.

As pack of that pack, there is an awesome activity where the kids take the “giant’s shoe” and look for things around the room that are shorter than the shoe, longer than the shoe, and the same length as the shoe.

So the kiddos took their “giant shoe” and were off searching the room!

https://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Product/Jack-and-the-Beanstalk-A-Nonstandard-Measurement-Unit-for-Common-Core-351371

Comparing Sizes

Comparing Sizes

Comparing Sizes

Comparing Sizes

Comparing Sizes

Comparing Sizes

Comparing Sizes

Spot! Of course the kids wanted to compare him to their shoes 🙂

Comparing Sizes

Comparing Sizes

As the kids were comparing things around the room, they used the simple organizer {that comes in that pack} to record the things they found. They wrote down the things they found that were longer than their shoe, shorter than their shoe, and the same length as their shoe.

Recording their Objects

Recording their Objects

Recording their Objects

Recording their Objects

Recording their Objects

Recording their Objects

Recording their Objects

Recording their Objects

Recording their Objects

Recording their Objects

Have younger students or kids who can’t quite write yet? This can be simply differentiated by having the kids draw pictures of the objects they find instead of writing them down. I encouraged my firsties to write what they found, sounding it out. Not only did this activity help us practice comparing lengths, but it also was a great way to talk about vocabulary. As they were exploring around the room, they asked each other {and me!} “What’s this called?” when they found an object. It opened up their eyes to different words and how to describe things!

Another non-standard measurement activity we did was “measure the teacher“. Another first grade teacher and I spent our planning time on the floor of the staff lounge {much to the laughs of our fellow teachers and ourselves!} tracing each other on butcher paper.

Measure the teacher!

Measure the teacher!

The kids were seriously EXCITED to see their “teacher” papers to measure. The kids had a recording paper and had to measure their teacher with a unit of their choosing.

Measure the teacher!

Measure the teacher!

Measure the teacher!

Measure the teacher!

This is also a great way for you as a teacher to see how they are measuring. We have been talking a lot about the correct ways to measure, with no gaps or overlaps between units. As I walked around, I heard a lot of them saying to each other “Don’t put a gap there!” 🙂

It’s also a great way to point out to kids that we measure in a straight line. Some groups might want to measure along the shape outline. It’s a simple chance to remind them to measure from one end to the other in a straight line.

Measure the teacher!

Measure the teacher!

Measure the teacher!

Measure the teacher!

Each group had to use four different units to measure their teacher. To manage this  {in a non-crazy way} I assigned one student in each group as the “unit picker”. That student was the only one who picked the groups unit and also the only one to put that unit away. This worked out really well and ensured that the groups weren’t fighting about what unit to pick. I just put a bunch of units out of the table and they were ready to go!

Measure the teacher!

Measure the teacher!

Measure the teacher!

Measure the teacher!

Measure the teacher!

Measure the teacher!

After, this led to a great discussion about why they got different numbers for their measurement of their “teacher”, based on the unit. {i.e. because the units are different sizes, when they use them to measure the teacher, they get different answers}

The kids had so much fun doing this and as an added bonus, I had them decorate their “teacher” when they were done. I must say, I really should have taken pictures of that because some of them were just hilarious! One group made me in a Halloween costume and another dressed me for winter {because it might get cold soon, they told me} 🙂

It’s been a great unit so far! Thanks for checking in to our adventure!

 

Woof! Non-standard “dog-bone” measuring!

I hope you enjoyed what my first 2 classes did to wrap-up the non-standard unit measuring week (remember measuring “Ms. Tasch”? 😉 )

Later that day with my older students, we also finished our time learning about non-standard measuring. To switch things up for them (and challenge them), we did a different activity that made them creatively think and find things around the room that were the length of a dog bone (and by dog bone, I of course mean a paper dog bone that they cut out of nice, clean paper!)

Each student got 10 dog bones that they needed to cut out. (It worked out so perfect because of course I had forgotten plastic baggies for them to put them in because during art that day, they had made bus tags using lanyards and plastic holders. Voila! These plastic holders doubled as instant “dog bone” holders.)

Cutting out the bones

Cutting out the bones

The students worked very hard- and so nicely- while they cut out their bones. I put on music for us to listen to as they worked, to which they told me that they felt like “boogie-ing” 🙂

After they cut out their measuring units, they were ready to work! The worksheet asked them to find things around the room that were 2 bones long, 5 bones long, 8 bones long, etc. So, they had to walk around, find something to measure, and see how many bones it was.

How many bones long is that bench?

How many bones long is that bench?

If they found something the correct number of bones, they wrote it down on their sheet. (Teacher tip: This also helps them practice estimation. They need to think critically about which objects will be a certain length. A student should estimate that that bench isn’t going to be 2 bones and won’t be 30 bones. This activity helps them realize how to make good estimations)

They also had to use the bones to measure certain objects, like a pencil…

Measuring

Measuring

and a table…

 

How many?

How many?

and of course remember to record all their answers…

 

Writing it down!

Writing it down!

The kids had a blast finding objects around the room and using these fun measuring units. I liked this activity because it helped them think critically, record results, and measure using non-standard units.

Teachers, this activity and more can be found at my TpT store in this bundle: Measurement Bundle

This week we’re working on number comparisons- greater than, less than, and equal to. Have a great Monday!

Measure Ms. Tasch

How fast did that weekend go by? It’s amazing how you can get so many things done in such a short amount of time! I spent my weekend with family- 2 graduation parties on Saturday and father’s dad on Sunday. It was the perfect weather to sit by the pool, grill, and relax (and laugh) with the people you love!

I didn’t get a chance to share what else we did in measurement last week. We were working on non-standard unit measurement (using things to measure that weren’t made to measure, like cubes, coins, dominoes, etc). During the school year, I had done this activity with my first graders, and it was a big hit, so I thought I’d give it a try during summer school for 2 of the classes. I gathered the students around the white board and after reviewing what non-standard measurement was, told them that today, we’d be measuring me- Ms. Tasch! The kids laughed, giggled, and rolled around, asking, “For real!?” I told them I had drawn smaller “Ms. Tasch’s” that they would be measuring using a variety of non-standard units.:)

To begin, they sat in groups and got their recording worksheets.

Next, they made a prediction of how many units they thought it would take to measure from the bottom of their “Ms.Tasch’s” toes to the top of their “Ms. Tasch’s” head. (Teacher tip: This activity could have easily been used to teach perimeter as well. In fact, some groups started out by putting their units around the edges of the person drawing. We had to stop to explain that we were measuring the height- toes to head- but for older students, they could measure height and perimeter).

Measuring using crayons!

Measuring using crayons!

We did the first unit together- crayons. We walked through making a “good” prediction and how to put the units in a line (touching, not overlapping) to get the measurement. After they got the unit in place, they counted how many it took. The kids did such a great job counting the units together like a team and writing down the answer.

Working like a team!

Working like a team!

After they finished the first unit-crayons- they raised their hands and I’d give them their choice of a next unit.

Measuring!

Measuring!

Some students used dominoes….

IMG_1466Or coins…

Measuring!

Measuring!

 

or shape blocks, fraction squares, dice, number tiles, etc (I was so busy watching and switching units between groups that I didn’t take pictures of those- sorry!) The kids loved this activity because it was fun and silly to measure their teacher. I loved this activity because it was an engaging, hands-on way for them to practice what we had been learning about all week. The kids showed their understanding of measuring using non-standard units and were able to record their results.

After, we sat in a group and talked about our answers. Not all groups used all the same materials, so groups shared out what they used and how many it took to measure “Ms. Tasch”. We also talked about if our predictions were close (why or why not) and why some groups answers were different, even if they used the same materials (I took the blame for this one… since I simply draw the oh-so-wonderful Ms. Tasch’s myself, they were close to the same size, but not perfectly similar. Oops!)

For teachers out there, check out my TpT store for this activity bundle, found here: Measurement Bundle

I’ll make another post next about what my other class did to wrap-up measurement! 🙂